DCBlog (David Crystal)

Linguist David Crystal’s blog.

oganesson

Element 118 received the name oganesson by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) in June 2016. Oganesson has the symbol Og. The element is named for Yuri Oganesson (b. 1933), a lead researcher at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The element was discovered in a collaborative effort between the Joint Institute and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

Oganesson is the second element to be named after a living person, the other being seaborgium, named for American chemist Glenn Seaborg, the discoverer of plutonium.

New IUPAC guidelines formulated in 2016 require new elements be named after either a mythological character or concept (or an astronomical object named after such a mythological concept), a mineral, a place, or a scientist. Elements in columns 1–16 of the periodic table take the usual suffix -ium. Those in column 17 take the suffix -ine, and those in column 18 the suffix -on. Oganesson is in column 18, hence the -on ending. Of course, older names for elements may not conform to these guidelines.


Source: “IUPAC is Naming the Four New Elements Nihonium, Moscovium, Tennessine, and Oganesson.” IUPAC press release. 8 June 2016.

[Discuss this post]

tennessine

Element 117 received the name tennessine by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) in June 2016. Tennessine has the symbol Ts. The element is named for the state of Tennessee, home of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Vanderbilt University. The element was discovered in by a collaborative effort involving researchers at Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

New IUPAC guidelines formulated in 2016 require new elements be named after either a mythological character or concept (or an astronomical object named after such a mythological concept), a mineral, a place, or a scientist. Elements in columns 1–16 of the periodic table take the usual suffix -ium. Those in column 17 take the suffix -ine, and those in column 18 the suffix -on. Tennessine is in column 17, hence the -ine ending. Of course, older names for elements may not conform to these guidelines.


Source: “IUPAC is Naming the Four New Elements Nihonium, Moscovium, Tennessine, and Oganesson.” IUPAC press release. 8 June 2016.

[Discuss this post]

livermorium

Element 116 received the name livermorium by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) in 2012. Livermorium has the symbol Lv. The element is named for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. The element was discovered in a collaborative effort by the Livermore lab and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia.


Source: Loss, Robert D. and John Corish. “Names and Symbols of the Elements with Atomic Numbers 114 and 116 (IUPAC Recommendations 2012).” Pure and Applied Chemistry, 84.7. June 2012. 1669–72.

[Discuss this post]

seaborgium

Seaborgium, element 106, is the first element named for a living person. The element was first synthesized in 1974 by a team at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1997, at the suggestion of its discoverers, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) named it for American chemist Glenn Seaborg (1912-1999), the Nobel laureate who contributed to the discovery of ten transuranic elements.1 Because Seaborg was still alive at the time, the name was controversial and only settled as part of the 1997 compromise that named elements 101–109.

(Some sources state that the precedent for naming an element after a living person was set with einsteinium, but the announcement of the discovery of that element and its subsequent naming did not occur until after Einstein’s death.)

The chemical symbol for seaborgium is Sg.


1”Names and Symbols of Transfermium Elements (IUPAC Recommendations 1997),” Chemistry International, 1998, Vol. 20, No. 2, p. 38, http://www.iupac.org/publications/ci/1998/march/recent.pdf

moscovium

Element 115 received the name moscovium by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) in June 2016. Moscovium has the symbol Mc. The element is named for the Moscow region—the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, where the element was discovered, is located in Dubna, about 75 miles (125 km) north of the city of Moscow.

New IUPAC guidelines formulated in 2016 require new elements be named after either a mythological character or concept (or an astronomical object named after such a mythological concept), a mineral, a place, or a scientist. Elements in columns 1–16 of the periodic table take the usual suffix -ium. Those in column 17 take the suffix -ine, and those in column 18 the suffix -on. Moscovium is in column 15, hence the -ium ending. Of course, older names for elements may not conform to these guidelines.


Source: “IUPAC is Naming the Four New Elements Nihonium, Moscovium, Tennessine, and Oganesson.” IUPAC press release. 8 June 2016.

[Discuss this post]

flerovium

Element 114 received the name flerovium by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) in 2012. Flerovium has the symbol Fl. The element is named for the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, part of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. the Joint Institute is a huge research facility employing scientists from around the world. The element was discovered in a collaborative effort by the Dubna scientists and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.


Source: Loss, Robert D. and John Corish. “Names and Symbols of the Elements with Atomic Numbers 114 and 116 (IUPAC Recommendations 2012).” Pure and Applied Chemistry, 84.7. June 2012. 1669–72.

[Discuss this post]

nihonium

Element 113 received the name nihonium by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) in June 2016. Nihonium has the symbol Nh. The element is named for Japan, Nihon, literally “land of the rising sun,” being one name for that nation in Japanese. The element was discovered by the Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science in Wako, Saitama, Japan. It’s the first element to be discovered in an Asian country.

New IUPAC guidelines formulated in 2016 require new elements be named after either a mythological character or concept (or an astronomical object named after such a mythological concept), a mineral, a place, or a scientist. Elements in columns 1–16 of the periodic table take the usual suffix -ium. Those in column 17 take the suffix -ine, and those in column 18 the suffix -on. Nihonium is in column 13, hence the -ium ending. Of course, older names for elements may not conform to these guidelines.


Source: “IUPAC is Naming the Four New Elements Nihonium, Moscovium, Tennessine, and Oganesson.” IUPAC press release. 8 June 2016.

[Discuss this post]

Latin Dictionary (Lewis & Short)

Lewis, Charlton T., and Charles Short. A Latin Dictionary. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

Lewis and Short for many years was the standard Latin dictionary and remains one of the two most often cited Latin dictionaries. Many classical scholars now prefer the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1982), but, despite its age, Lewis and Short is a better source for medieval and post-classical Latin.

The Perseus digital library at Tufts University has made Lewis and Short available and searchable online for free.

Powered by ExpressionEngine
Copyright 1997-2016, by David Wilton