Nuclear Option

A term in the news quite a lot lately is nuclear option. The current usage isn’t the literal meaning of the words, some political or military strategy involving weapons of mass destruction. Rather, the nuclear option in the news is metaphorical. It refers to the US Senate changing the rules regarding filibuster to allow more of President Bush’s judicial nominees to be confirmed and take the bench.

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Taxing Terms

In the United States, today is the day when tax returns and payments are due to the Internal Revenue Service. It is "tax day." The verb to tax appears in English usage as early as ca.1290. The word comes from the Old French taxe, which is after the Latin taxare. The noun tax appears in English sometime before 1327.

Internal revenue is the term used in the United States for taxes collected domestically, as opposed to custom duties levied on imports. The term dates to 1862, when the first Commissioner of Internal Revenue was appointed to collect income taxes to fund the U.S. Civil War. This first U.S. income tax was a wartime measure and was repealed in 1872. The income tax was re-imposed in 1894, but was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court the following year. It wasn’t until the passage of the 16th amendment in 1913 that explicitly permitted an income tax was the tax permanently instituted. In the United Kingdom, the corresponding term is inland revenue, a term that dates to 1849.

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A Demonstration of the Futility of Using Microsoft Word’s Spelling and Grammar Check

Frustrated with your spell checker? That it can’t tell you when to use "there" or "their" (and forget about "they’re")? Does the grammar checker on your word processor miss bad grammar while flagging perfectly good sentences as improper?

If so, you’re not alone. Check out http://faculty.washington.edu/sandeep/check/ and find at least one other who commiserates with you.

Dot Com

While conducting research for biztechdictionary.com I got to thinking about the domain name and the term dot com. The etymology isn’t very mysterious, but exactly when did the term and its various meanings arise.

The term dot com is used in the pronunciation of internet domain names and it is also used to refer to internet-based companies. But who decided that commercial internet addresses should end in .com and when did people start referring to companies as dot coms? And going further back, why and when did people start referring the "." mark as "dot"?

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In Passing: Eleanor Gould

Eleanor Gould is a name that is probably not familiar to most of you, but over the course of her fifty-four year career as “grammarian” for The New Yorker, Gould had a quiet, but profound impact on the world of letters. Miss Gould passed away last month at the age of eighty seven. You can read her magazine’s tribute to her here.

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