Bodge
Posted: 17 January 2009 08:30 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Have we done this before? - (searches turn up nothing). Does it come from “botch” and does “bodger”, a maker of chairs have a separate derivation, or is the modern word being unfair to the quality of the chairmakers’ products?

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Posted: 17 January 2009 09:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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What is “bodge”?

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Posted: 17 January 2009 09:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It is indeed an altered form of botch. OED marks it obsolete or dialectical. I’m sure that’s not true now, the form is not uncommon in the UK.

bodge, v.

Obs. or dial.

[An altered form of BOTCH v.; cf. grudge from grutch.]

1. trans. To patch or mend clumsily.
1552 HULOET, Bodge or botche olde clothes. 1570 LEVINS Manip. 156 To Bodge, sarcire. 1870 {emem} [in Leicestersh., Nth. Lincolnsh., Shropsh., and other dial. Glossaries].

2. to bodge up: to put together clumsily; to botch up, to do or make up in a clumsy fashion.
1578 T. WHITE Serm. St. Paules Cross 33 To bodge up a house which will never abide the trial. Ibid. 47 A disease is but bodged or patched up that is not cured in the cause. 1593 NASHE Christ’s T. 55b, They..that bungle and bodge vppe wicked verses. 1881 Daily News 31 Aug. 2/2 Gaps bodged up by the rudest of post and pole barriers.

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Posted: 17 January 2009 11:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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There was a children’s programme in the UK in the 1980s called Bodger and Badger where the human half of the pair was Bodger - I suspect his name came from that word.

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Posted: 17 January 2009 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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languagehat - 17 January 2009 09:07 AM

What is “bodge”?

Sorry, it must be one of them words you don’t have over there.  What word do you use in the US instead?

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Posted: 17 January 2009 01:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Kludge (klooj) is not a perfect equivalent, but carries much of the same sense of a clumsy, makeshift, solution to a problem.

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Posted: 18 January 2009 01:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Anything on the chairmaking sort of bodging?

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Posted: 18 January 2009 02:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Nothing in OED that I could find as the references mainly allude to clumsiness.  I guess that bodger as in chair-maker is from the midlands and the south of England, rather than the north.  I found this site about the chair-making meaning of bodger:

In many dictionaries you will not find the word bodging, bodgers or bodger. You might find the word bodge, meaning to botch or mend clumsily.
However, actually a bodger was a skilled craftsman that made chair legs and braces. The craft of bodging goes back about five hundred years

as well as a site about the bodgers of Buckinghamshire with a photo of a bodger in action here.

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Posted: 18 January 2009 01:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Well, there’s this:

bodger, n.³
dial.
In full chair bodger. A local name in Buckinghamshire for a chair-leg turner. Hence (chair-)bodgering, the action or process of chair-leg turning.

1911 G. ELAND Chilterns & Vale vi. 136 The men who thus work in the woods are called ‘chair-bodgers’. Ibid. 137 The purchaser then employs the ‘bodger’ to turn it [sc. a ‘fall’ of beech] into chair-legs. 1921 K. S. WOODS Rural Industries round Oxford II. i. 102 Most village turners or ‘chair bodgers’ confine themselves to the making of legs which they sell to the factories, mainly at Wycombe. 1939 D. HARTLEY Made in England i. 23 The shed for bodgering jobs may be left standing the whole year.

And also:

bodging, vbl. n.²
(dial.)
= bodgering; see BODGER³.

1953 A. JOBSON Househ. & Country Crafts xx. 178 Of all the woodland crafts, that of chair-bodging seems the most rural. 1957 Times 2 July (Agric. Suppl.) p. viii/7 The demonstration of chair leg bodging.

No separate etymologies are given; presumably this sense derives from those already discussed.

[ Edited: 18 January 2009 01:46 PM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 19 January 2009 02:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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The chair-mending sense of bodge harks back to the original meaning of botch.

OED:

botch, v.1

1. trans. To make good or repair (a defect, damage, damaged article); to patch, mend. Now only: to repair clumsily or imperfectly. Often with up.

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Posted: 20 January 2009 03:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Well spotted, Dr T and aldi!  Your jobs here are secure.

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