Publically
Posted: 31 July 2009 09:58 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I don’t know how this one passed under my radar for so long. I was about to dismiss it as a solecism when a check with MWO revealed it as a variant spelling with a distinct pronunciation. (OED however gives it a separate entry, with a first cite in the late 18th century and the latest from the Daily Telegraph in 1998).

So what’s the story? Have members of the board come across it? Does anybody use it? It gets a pretty respectable googlit rating of 5 million, as opposed to 45 million for publicly. Would it be more common in the US?

[ Edited: 31 July 2009 10:02 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 31 July 2009 10:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Would it be more common in the US?

I don’t think so.  It looks odd to me, and if I were less cautious I would say I’d never seen it before.

Edit: I’m not so sure about that 5 million.  I get only about 4 million, and if I put it in quotes or put a + in front of it, I only get around 2 million.

[ Edited: 31 July 2009 07:55 PM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 31 July 2009 01:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I don’t think I’ve ever seen it either.  It would assume the existence of a word publical, would it not?

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Posted: 31 July 2009 02:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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It would assume the existence of a word publical, would it not?

As orientation assumes orientate?

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Posted: 31 July 2009 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I’ve seen it many times, and I imagine you all have too, but being a copyeditor by profession I notice these things, whereas most people just assimilate the misspelling to the correct version without even realizing it.  (I say “misspelling” with my copyediting hat on, of course; as Languagehat I would simply call it a less common version.)

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Posted: 31 July 2009 06:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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A few other (analogous) possibilities. Which ones do you like?

catholically
caustically
cholerically
fantastically
frantically
heroically
prolifically
romantically
rustically
symbolically

Obviously some are very common, others less so.

All of these, like “publically”, appear in MW3. Each of these has a variant without “-al-” (like “publicly") in MW3 too.

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Posted: 31 July 2009 11:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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jheem - 31 July 2009 02:55 PM

It would assume the existence of a word publical, would it not?

As orientation assumes orientate?

As indeed there is (or was).

From OED:

publical, adj.

Obs. rare.

[< post-classical Latin publicalis (8th cent. in a British source; < classical Latin publicus PUBLIC adj. + alis -AL suffix1. Compare earlier PUBLIC adj. and later PUBLICALLY adv.]

Public.

c1450 Alphabet of Tales (1904) I. 248 In gude felowshupp..{th}er suld all publicall honor and wurshup sese betwix {th}e fadur & {th}e son.
1898 Catholic World May 240 Even the unselfish and the honest patriots feel a glow of pleasure in the doling out of the loaves and fishes, for they believe that success begets success and state and nation will be their next publical advance.

As to Douglas’ list, fantastically I like, probably because the word fantastical often crops up in pre-20th century literature, most of the others just seem odd.

[ Edited: 31 July 2009 11:51 PM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 01 August 2009 02:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Nowadays, “fantastic” just seems to mean “great fun”, whereas “fantastical” retains its meaning as the adjective from “fantasy” (or “phantasy”; when did the spelling change?).

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Posted: 01 August 2009 05:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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bayard - 01 August 2009 02:27 AM

Nowadays, “fantastic” just seems to mean “great fun”, whereas “fantastical” retains its meaning as the adjective from “fantasy” (or “phantasy”; when did the spelling change?).

OED takes up the tale of fantasy, phantasy and fancy.

The shortened form FANCY, which apparently originated in the 15th c., had in the time of Shakespeare become more or less differentiated in sense. After the revival of Greek learning, the longer form was often spelt phantasy, and its meaning was influenced by the Gr. etymon. In mod. use fantasy and phantasy, in spite of their identity in sound and in ultimate etymology, tend to be apprehended as separate words, the predominant sense of the former being ‘caprice, whim, fanciful invention’, while that of the latter is ‘imagination, visionary notion’

Thus the earliest form is fantasy (or some approximate spelling thereof) with cites going back to the 14th century and Chaucer, while the earliest cite in OED for the Greek-influenced phantasy (or again some approximation thereof) seems to be this Lallans one:

1535 STEWART Cron. Scot. III. 365 Trowand that tyme it wes ane phantasie.

Cites from English authors for the form appear soon after.

[ Edited: 01 August 2009 06:04 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 01 August 2009 02:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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catholically
caustically
cholerically
fantastically
frantically
heroically
prolifically
romantically
rustically
symbolically
in addition to publically makes me think of Gilbert and Sullivan and their sometimes forced rhymes and meter:

“Conjugally matrimonified” from Pirates of Penzance for example.

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Posted: 03 August 2009 06:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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After I posted my question about publical, I began ruminating over the difference between historic and historical, and wondering if there were such a word as publical, what exactly might it mean?  And yes, like the other words listed, I noticed that there is a historically, but not, as far as I know, historicly.

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Posted: 03 August 2009 06:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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donkeyhotay - 03 August 2009 06:04 AM

After I posted my question about publical, I began ruminating over the difference between historic and historical, and wondering if there were such a word as publical, what exactly might it mean?  And yes, like the other words listed, I noticed that there is a historically, but not, as far as I know, historicly.

No, OED doesn’t list historicly, either as an alternative spelling or a word in its own right.

As for the archaic publical, it simply meant public. (See the OED entry in my post #6 above).

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Posted: 03 August 2009 08:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Publically is, by the way, one of my most consistent misspellings. Along with alchohol.

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Posted: 04 August 2009 07:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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donkeyhotay reminded me of Marlowe’s The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus which sounds archaic but then there is Magical Mystery Tour by The Beatles and The Rutles parody, Tragical History Tour. Magic wouldn’t scan in The Beatles song and magical sounds more evocative.

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