Scrappage
Posted: 08 August 2009 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Driving along Edinburgh’s “motor mile” at Seafield, I saw a large sign advertising “scrappage” incentives, which I found out later is a government backed scheme to encourage the buying of new cars.

My interest was piqued by the word “scrappage” . A neologism for sure, (and not a particularly felicitous one) but when and whence did it originate ?

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Posted: 08 August 2009 01:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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murrmac - 08 August 2009 12:18 PM

A neologism for sure ............

Them’s fighting words to the OED, and sure enough ..........

scrappage

[f. SCRAP n.1 or v.3 + -AGE.]

= SCRAPPING vbl. n.2

1949 Sun (Baltimore) 24 Mar. 8/3 Scrappage of passenger cars in 1948 was approximately half of the normal scrappage rate. 1950 Engineering 6 Jan. 26/3 Internal stresses may lead to serious scrappage on account of cracking. 1960 Economist 22 Oct. 359/1 Apart from natural growth in the population, sales are wholly for replacement and are related to the rate of scrappage and obsolescence. 1972 Guardian 29 Mar. 14/2 He says that the scrappage rate for US cars is roughly stable at 40 per cent of the new registration increase. 1976 Nature 17 June 540/2 The causes are recognised engineering factors such as shaft seals, maintenance operations, permeation and eventual scrappage.

Scrapping, vbl. n. 2, is defined as the action of ‘sending to the scrap-heap’.

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Posted: 09 August 2009 08:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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a government backed scheme to encourage the buying of new cars

Known in the Leftpondia as cash for clunkers. The US version of the scheme is in the news lately, a victim of its own success as it ran out of money days after its inception.

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Posted: 10 August 2009 07:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Is there a Brit equivalent of clunker? I favour American POS (piece of shit) thought this could be a bad new car or any car you don’t like. Is rattletrap a crosspondage?

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Posted: 10 August 2009 07:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Not as much of a neologism as I had supposed, apparently, though I suspect its ancestry probably doesn’t extend much further than the fifties.

“Scrappage” sits uneasily with me, it sounds like one of these words that you just know has been cobbled together by some anonymous civil servant, a bit like “pro-active”.

The British equivalent to “clunker” is “banger”, or at least it was in my younger days when they were all I could afford to drive ...

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Posted: 12 August 2009 10:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yes, murrmac, I’d forgotten “banger” probably from backfires (which would cause dodgy characters to crouch behind cars and then emerge all sheepish, like, and sidle off affecting nonchalance). Banger was a lot more prevalent than rattletrap. Remember RUNNING IN PLEASE PASS signs on new cars?

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Posted: 13 August 2009 05:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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venomousbede - 12 August 2009 10:48 AM

Remember RUNNING IN PLEASE PASS signs on new cars?

That brings back memories, along with the endless number of cars broken down by the side of the road, and having to “double de-clutch” with manual gear change because there was no synchromesh in first gear. Not to mention the “trafficator” as I believe it was called, the little yellow indicator which flicked out of the center column behind the window when you indicated which way you wanted to turn.

such fun ...

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Posted: 13 August 2009 05:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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murrmac - 13 August 2009 05:00 AM

Not to mention the “trafficator” as I believe it was called, the little yellow indicator which flicked out of the center column behind the window when you indicated which way you wanted to turn.

such fun ...

Haven’t thought of those in years. It looks to have been a brand name at first. First cite in OED is for the ‘Lucas Trafficator’ in a 1933 Autocar magazine.

1933 Autocar 13 Oct. 733/1 (caption) The Lucas Trafficator is concealed when not in use.

I remember those Running In Please Pass signs on cars too. Don’t they need to run in engines now?

Another long vanished sight, motorists at the front of their car handcranking the engine with a starting handle.

[ Edited: 13 August 2009 05:41 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 13 August 2009 06:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Remember “Jalopy”?  From Wiki:  “Jalopy (also clunker or hooptie) is an old, decrepit, unreliable and often nonfunctional car which has limited mechanical abilities and is often in an unmaintained and often in a rusty or dented shape. A jalopy is not a well kept antique car, but a car which is mostly rundown or beaten up. As a slang term in American English, “Jalopy” was noted in 1924 but is now slightly passé.

When a jalopy gets to a state in which its maintenance becomes too expensive, its owner would be required to make a decision about its fate. Some owners abandon it in the street as a parked car (an action forbidden by law in most jurisdictions).[citation needed] If it remains parked, the local authority commonly tows it to the junk yard. Other people may then sell it (or deliver it) to be stripped for spare parts for use in other vehicles.

Etymology

The origin of the word is unknown. It is possible that the non Spanish-speaking New Orleans-based longshoremen, referring to scrapped autos destined for Jalapa, Mexico scrapyards, pronounced the destination on the palettes “jalopies” rather than multiples or possessive of Jalapa.

Origin: 1929- We find a definition in print in 1929: “Jaloppi--A cheap make of automobile; an automobile fit only for junking.” The definition has stayed the same, but it took a while for the spelling to stop bouncing around. Among the variants have been jallopy, jaloppy, jollopy, jaloopy, jalupie, julappi, jalapa, and jaloppie.

John Steinbeck spelled it gillopy in In Dubious Battle (1936): “Sam trotted off toward the bunk houses, and London followed more slowly. John Weir the Great, King of the Nords and Jim circled the building and went to the ancient Ford touring car. ‘Get in, Jim. You drive the gillopy.’ A roar of voices came from the other side of the bunk house. Jim turned the key and retarded the spark lever. The coils buzzed like little rattlesnakes.”

Jalopy seems to have replaced flivver (1910), which in the early decades of the twentieth century also simply meant “a failure.” Other early terms for a wreck of a car included heap, tin lizzie (1915), and crate (1927).

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Posted: 13 August 2009 06:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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aldiboronti - 13 August 2009 05:37 AM


I remember those Running In Please Pass signs on cars too.

What does that even mean?!

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Posted: 13 August 2009 07:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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’Running in’ was an old phrase for gently getting a new car motor ready for use. The idea was to drive a new car or car with a new engine very sedately for a specified period of time to give all the moving parts the chance to settle in to their right place. Put it down to not quite precision engineering as we know it today, where we get in and drive without worrying about the engine. IIRC the engine was serviced immediately after being run in, with a view to tightening up the various bolts etc at the right tension once all the moving parts had settled in. By way of crude analogy, you run yourself in to an unfamiliar car by driving for a while and then moving the seat forward a bit, the steering column up a bit, the mirror out a bit, until you have it right. Cars being Run In often would have a sign on the back of them informing following drivers that the slow pace was intentional and that they shouldn’t expect the car to speed up any time soon. It was best to overtake (pass) the slower car. Spike Milligan had a lovely cartoon of a police car with a criminal’s head showing in the back window. The sign on the car said: “Running In. Please pass”.

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Posted: 14 August 2009 02:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Aah.  Here in Lower Leftpondia we called it ‘breaking the engine in.’ I was taking ‘In Please Pass’ as a prepositional phrase.  ‘Running in engines’ didn’t help much.  It makes sense now.

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