1 of 2
1
dachshund
Posted: 01 September 2009 07:55 AM   [ Ignore ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1190
Joined  2007-04-28

My family in the UK used to have one when I was a small child and we always pronounced it dax-hund or daxy for short, which I thought was universal (having no knowledge of German then or now). I remember finding out it meant badger-dog in German which explains the shape, and later found it in the Eggcorn Database as “dashound” or “dashhound” (ironic considering its speed), a weird pronunciation of “ch”, I thought, which I couldn’t understand at all at the time, but wiki explains this:

Variations of the pronunciation include däks’hoont, -hʊnt, -hʊnd, -ənd, dɑks-, dæks-, dæʃ-)

Can any dog have so may alternative pronunciations? How is it pronounced in the States and elsewhere? I don’t think we can look to German for guidance as they call it a Dackel (or a Teckel if it hunts), according to wiki. It is also commonly called a sausage dog in the UK and a wiener dog in the States (which is more faithful etymologically to its Germanic origins). It lends itself to slang. I suppose it depends how far the breed has travelled.

I found online that the Spanish is perro salchicha (sausage dog), Italian is bassotto (bassett hound is cane bassotto - this sounds wrong, surely they distinguish between the two breeds), French is teckel.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 September 2009 10:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  429
Joined  2007-02-14

We call it a ‘dashond’, which might be a calque of the German name or an original formation (das = badger), but generally they are called ‘tekkels’.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 September 2009 11:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3338
Joined  2007-01-29

U.S. pronunciations are \ˈdäks-ˌhu̇nt, -ˌhu̇nd; ˈdäk-sənt\; we used the last (="doxent") in our family, and the other (apparently more common) pronunciations sound artificial to me, like someone trying to imitate German (which is a reflection on me, of course, and not them; it’s just another example of how natural our own traditions seem to us).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 September 2009 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  30
Joined  2007-07-17

Dash hound is fairly common in Oz, as is dackie and Dax hound. We have a couple of dachshunds and we also get alternative names, including: “It’s a slinky” or “It’s a sausage dog dog”. The ‘ach’ within dachshund is simply not pronounced in English how it is German. The closest I can suggest is if you try to combine the pronunciations of ‘dark’ with ‘duck’. Even then it doesn’t quite have that lovely Germanic throat clearing sound. In the absence of being able to come up with an English pronunciation, we all probably came up with something that was close enough, using the language sounds we know, in the absence of knowing how it was ‘supposed’ to be pronounced in German. I’ve also seen Doxie used in the US too. Why the Germans call their national breed (a dachie was the mascot at the ‘72 Munich Olympics)Dachshunds, and then call the Teckels or Dackels is another mystery. Dachshunds: Two dogs long. Half a dog high.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 September 2009 04:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  776
Joined  2007-03-01

Why the Germans call their national breed Dachshunds, and then call the Teckels or Dackels is another mystery.

Is it? Colloquial German words are often made by chopping off the back end of the full word, and adding the suffix -el or -l is a classic way of forming a diminutive in German (cf. Hansel and Gretel). Those two processes get you “Dachel”, of which Teckel or Dackel is a natural enough variant in many German dialects. It’s no odder, to my mind, than calling a West Highland White Terrier a “Westie”.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 September 2009 05:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1190
Joined  2007-04-28

Fascinating, thanks. I love it that “doxy” and “doxie” is used in the States, considering the alt meanings of those.
I only learned what an American wiener was in adulthood (yeah, bring it on, I know the other meaning too, now) as we called them frankfurters. We also used to say beefburger not hamburger in pre-Big Mac days. Beefburg isn’t a German city so the American name was better but cheeseburg, baconburg etc.
An old lady keeps a male and a female dash hound and a friend enquires what she does when the latter is in oestrus. “I just put the female upstairs - have you ever seen an aroused male docent, I mean doxent, trying to climb a flight of stairs?”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 September 2009 08:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  93
Joined  2008-05-07

I’ve also seen Doxie used in the US too.

I’ve never seen it written thus in the U.S., although that approximates one common pronunciation here. I think I’ve almost always seen the name written out in full (though not necessarily spelled correctly). And I don’t deny that Brad might have seen it written so, but I suspect that it was also a misspelling.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 September 2009 01:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  18
Joined  2009-07-14

We are dachshund owners and love the breed.

däks -ˌhu̇nd

At the AKC dog show that takes place every year in New York at Madison Square Gardens, this is the pronunciation that has been used ever since we started following the event since at least the eighties.

My German background disallows me to pronounce it without the lovely throat clearing.  I know it can sound affected, but it would just curl my toes to do otherwise.  I think of my high school history teacher that called the German air force of WWII the “luft waif.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 September 2009 03:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1129
Joined  2007-02-14

My understanding of German pronunciation is that the ch is pronounced like a k when followed by an s.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 September 2009 06:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4478
Joined  2007-01-03

The IPA pronunciation given in the OED2 is / ‘dakshʊnd /. MW has audio of two different pronunciations, but the / ks / sound is the same in both.

[ Edited: 04 September 2009 06:27 AM by Dave Wilton ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 September 2009 08:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2745
Joined  2007-01-31

My Langenscheidts’s supports Faldy’s statement that in German, the ch in Dachs is pronounced without aspiration, like an ordinary English /k/, not with the aspirated, throat-clearing, loch-style sound that Schloff is (apparently misguidedly) putting in there.  That aspirated ch would be correct for Dach (roof) but not for Dachs (badger).

The second of the two MW audio pronunciations (with the /d/ ending) is the most familiar to me.  The /t/ ending is certainly more authentically German, but isn’t how most of the English speakers I know say the word.

[ Edited: 04 September 2009 08:05 AM by Dr. Techie ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 September 2009 09:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  18
Joined  2009-07-14

I stand corrected. 
Allow me to clarify.
I still maintain a bit of airiness before the harder K, otherwise it will come off sounding like “dock.”
Perhaps a subtle and unnecessary distinction and one of my own making.
(Blush)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2009 11:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1190
Joined  2007-04-28

Interesting stuff here about names for badgers. I knew brock in English (which was also a fireworks company) and seems to be of Celtic origin. There are creepy “gravelings” in the US TV series Dead Like Me but the Scandinavian root (grav, etc. as in “Faroese, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish (grevlingur, grevling, grävling, grævling")) means “dig” but then that is what one does in graveyards? Cf. Danish Kierkergaard = church (kirk) yard, and ga(a)rden is yard in American English.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2009 11:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1190
Joined  2007-04-28

Also, the Italian is tasso as in the poet Torquato Tasso, and Badger is a surname in English. How do you end up being called this?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2009 11:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  26
Joined  2007-07-16

I used to have to give English dictations in Germany, and I had a dictation, from Nabokov’s ‘Memory’ I think I took it, with ‘dachshunds’ in it. Some students wrote ‘daxons’. When we discussed the text afterwards, most of them didn’t know what a Dachshund was in German, because they called them Dackel.

Margaret

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2009 11:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  311
Joined  2007-02-17
venomousbede - 08 September 2009 11:17 AM

Also, the Italian is tasso as in the poet Torquato Tasso, and Badger is a surname in English. How do you end up being called this?

According to Ancestry.com

Tasso
Italian: topographic name for someone who lived near a prominent yew tree, Italian tasso (Latin taxus, genitive taxi).
Italian: from a Germanic personal name derived from the obscure element tat, possibly akin to Old High German tat ‘deed’. Compare English Tate.
nickname for a person thought to resemble a badger, for example in his nocturnal habits, from Italian tasso ‘badger’ (Late Latin taxo, genitive taxonis, of Germanic origin).
Greek (Tassos): from a reduced form of the personal name Anastasios (see Anastas) or a patronymic derived from it, such as Anastasopoulos.

and

Badger
habitational name from a place in Shropshire named Badger, probably from an unattested Old English personal name Bæcg + Old English ofer ‘ridge’.
occupational name for a maker of bags (see Bagge 1) or for a peddler who carried his wares about with him in a bag. It is unlikely that the surname has anything to do with the animal (see Brock 2), which was not known by this name until the 16th century.

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
 
‹‹ Take a hinge      chlorine ››