“chicharrones”
Posted: 15 September 2009 09:34 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Is there an English word for those little crispy-crunchy brown pieces left in the pan after rendering down fatty animal tissue, such as chicken skin?  In my Spanish-speaking childhood, they were called ”chicharrones” ("chicharra" = cicada, cricket) - presumably, because of the sound they made during rendering. In Yiddish, they are called ”gribbenes”.

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Posted: 15 September 2009 09:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Grebenes -some call it chicken crackling.

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Posted: 16 September 2009 12:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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In Rightpondia bits of pork skin rendered down in this way are called ‘pork scratchings’ and are widely sold in little packets in pubs, just like crisps (= US potato chips’) and peanuts. Some manufacturers, who evidently feel that ‘scratchings’ has a distasteful or ungenteel ring to it, label them ‘pork cracklings*’. But nobody calls them that – you see a card of little packets marked ‘Pork Cracklings’ and say to the barmaid, “A pint of Abbots and a packet of scratchings please”.

Over here we don’t normally treat any other kind of skin in the same way, but if you were to say ‘chicken scratchings’ I imagine most Rightpondians would work out what you meant.

* In the UK ‘crackling’, properly understood, is the crisp skin on a joint of roast pork. Whoever carves and serves is likely to say “Who would like a bit of the crackling?”
But if any skin is left over from the meal and you render it down in the oven and drain off the fat, it’s no longer crackling but scratchings.

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Posted: 16 September 2009 02:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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In German, they’re Grieben, and in Bavarian/Austrian Grammeln. Usually made from pork fat, unless religious laws dictate otherwise.

I checked an online German dictionary to find the English, and was surprised to find greaves, which I know only as a piece of armor. Then I Googled and found this

http://naturallyindulgent.wordpress.com/2007/12/13/grammeln-greaves-grieben-gribenes-gribbenes-griven-pork-floss/

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Posted: 16 September 2009 03:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Sean Ferguson - 16 September 2009 02:47 AM

In German, they’re Grieben, and in Bavarian/Austrian Grammeln. Usually made from pork fat, unless religious laws dictate otherwise.

I checked an online German dictionary to find the English, and was surprised to find greaves, which I know only as a piece of armor. Then I Googled and found this

http://naturallyindulgent.wordpress.com/2007/12/13/grammeln-greaves-grieben-gribenes-gribbenes-griven-pork-floss/

Fascinating. Greaves is new to me too. Here’s OED:

greaves, graves n, pl.

[app. originally a term of the whale fisheries; ad. LG. greven pl. (whence Sw. dial. grevar, Da. grever), corresp. to OHG. griubo, griobo (MHG., G. griebe), which agrees in form with OE. gréoua (= *gréofa) ‘olla’.]

The fibrous matter or skin found in animal fat, which forms a sediment on melting and is pressed into cakes to serve as meat for dogs or hogs, fish-bait, etc.; the refuse of tallow; cracklings.

1614 G. MARKHAM Cheape & Good Husb. 97 Chandlers Graiues [printed Graines], which is the dregges and offall of rendred Tallow, as hard skinnes, kels, and fleshly lumpes.

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Posted: 16 September 2009 06:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Commonly known as pork rinds throughout the US.

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Posted: 16 September 2009 06:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Bacon rind has to be inedible everywhere. I remember a female character in John Updike’s Couples being found using one as a bookmark.
Pork scratchings are popular in Thailand where they are completely dry like crisps and sold in plastic bags. They are called “gep moo” meaning saved pig.  I much prefer the partly moist English ones sold in pubs.
In fish ‘n’ chip shops I used to ask for a free bag of the deep-fried fragments of batter left over from frying the fish which we called scraps. I remember reading there were lots of regional names for these.

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Posted: 16 September 2009 11:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Many thanks all!  I learned a new word (don’t see myself using it much, mind - “greaves” sounds a little recherché for the company I keep)—and was confronted with an entirely new concept, chocolate-coated gribbenes!!! Someone’s going to come up with chocolate-coated sheep’s eyes, next (sheep’s eyes are a great delicacy in some parts of the Middle East)

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Posted: 17 September 2009 10:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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"Crackling”. That’s what we called them at the hog killings I remember in rural Tennessee in the 1940’s. For a definition and a reminiscence that dove-tails with my own memory, see http://www.tngenweb.org/stewart/hog.htm

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