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cricket
Posted: 04 March 2013 03:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Aldi’s wordplay makes me wonder if the similarity of “chimney cricket” (esp. with a dialectical trisyllabic [or disesquisyllabic] pronunciation of “chimney") and “jiminy cricket” had something to do with the origin of “cricket” as a name for that bit of roofing hardware.

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Posted: 27 November 2013 12:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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lionello - 04 March 2013 01:51 PM

Good thinking, space toast. But for you, I would still be puzzled as to what a cricket on a roof actually is.

Welcome to this forum, and keep on coming.

You just stepped on the bucket lionello. However, good point, as if the edge of the cricket was placed right beside the Chimney.

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Posted: 27 November 2013 07:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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As previously mentioned, the term currently seems to be indigenous to North America, rather than both sides of the water, so I doubt that the shape of the tip of a cricket bat has much to do with it. Still, the possibility remains that this is yet another archaism which survived in America while being lost in Britain. Commendable illustration, though!

Having spent many hours working on roofs myself, I admit I came up with a theory regarding the origin of the term (to do with the shape and position, and the insect’s traditional association with the hearth, rather than a more proper linguistic analysis), but that was merely the sort of idle speculation in which one engages while carrying out the more tedious aspects of a job.

The Carpentry Way blog has a very interesting, yet still inconclusive entry on the topic.

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