2010
Posted: 31 December 2009 07:04 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Idly flicking through the TV channels I noted that many of the announcers, blazoning their new line-ups for January, favoured the form twenty-ten. This got me thinking about the last decade. Two thousand for 2000 was of course a natural. Two thousand and one followed comfortably, its way prepared years before by the Kubrick movie, always so spoken. The rest of the decade followed suit and one rarely if ever heard twenty-oh-five, twenty-oh-eight, etc.

But what now? Will we fall back into the usual pattern (ten-sixty-six, nineteen-ten). Or will two thousand whatever continue to predominate, having established itself, so to speak? Any straws in the wind, on either side of the pond?

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Posted: 31 December 2009 10:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Some of the reports I write deal with projections out a few years.  I’ve noticed that I, and my coworkers, are saying “twenty-ten”, “twenty-twelve”, etc.  We are still saying “two-thousand-nine”.  So, it seems like a lot of us are making that transition, at least in my neck of the woods (Oklahoma, Leftpondia).

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Posted: 31 December 2009 11:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yes, I find it unlikely that any substantial number of people will choose to use “two-thousand-ten” rather than the shorter and perfectly natural “twenty-ten.”

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Posted: 31 December 2009 01:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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In Rightpondia, I notice that most TV announcers go for “twenty-twelve” and “twenty-Fourteen” with reference to the forthcoming Olympic and Commonwealth Games, but a minority use the “two thousand and...” formula.

Which raises another question. As a Brit I call the current year “two thousand and nine” (still current - 3 hours to go here at time of writing), rather than the Leftpondian “two thousand nine”. I know the same difference exists in the way other numbers are read aloud. Is the missing and an elision in American usage or something that Brits have inserted?

A happy 2010 to one and all on this board - however you choose to pronounce it!

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Posted: 31 December 2009 04:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I find it impossible to believe that in 10 years’ time we won’t all be saying “twentytwenty”. As for the coming decade, I believe Dr F is probably right in suggesting that the majority will probably say “twenty(x)teen, but a minority will stick to “two thousand and whatever”.

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Posted: 01 January 2010 09:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Dr Fortran - 31 December 2009 01:01 PM

Is the missing and an elision in American usage

What is taught in American schools is that “and” is the pronunciation of “.” in numbers, i.e. 123.45 is said and written out one-hundred, twenty-three and forty-five hundredths (or on a check “… and 45/100).  Of course, what occurs after school is out ...

[ Edited: 01 January 2010 09:56 AM by Myridon ]
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Posted: 04 January 2010 01:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I like saying “oh-ten”.  I’m told the Steven Colbert television character says that but I’m going to keep doing it anyway.  For a while, at least.

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