Ash blond
Posted: 12 June 2010 02:43 AM   [ Ignore ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

Does the “ash” in “ash blond” come from the tree or the products of combustion?  I had always thought the latter, but then it occurred to me that the former was more reasonable.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 03:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3062
Joined  2007-02-26

How so?  I’d’ve thought it was bound to be connected to the pale grey of some ash.

S’weird to use “ash” to denote a colour given that ashes can be black or white or any shade of grey. Ho hum.

Then again, eggplant (the colour) always means poiple, not white.

Anyone here old enough to have owned a pencil or crayon with “flesh colour” written on it?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 04:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1365
Joined  2007-01-29

It was a pinkey-beige, so probably not politically correct now.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 05:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22
OP Tipping - 12 June 2010 03:10 AM

How so?  I’d’ve thought it was bound to be connected to the pale grey of some ash.

S’weird to use “ash” to denote a colour given that ashes can be black or white or any shade of grey. Ho hum.

Which is partly why I thought it might be the tree, in that ash, the timber, is a pale blond colour.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 05:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2313
Joined  2007-01-30

OED lists the phrase under ash, n.2, the powdery residue left after combustion.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 05:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3062
Joined  2007-02-26

BTW Is the tree also named after the powdery residue left after combustion?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 05:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4695
Joined  2007-01-03

Nope, from two distinct Old English words.

The tree is from the OE ├Žsc. The residue of combustion is from axe or asce.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 06:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3062
Joined  2007-02-26

Ta.

Interesting one, bayard.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2010 08:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

Thanks, everyone.  I’m left wondering why “ash” then, given the range of colours ash can be, and not something else that is white, however I do appreciate there is seldom any logic to these things.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 June 2010 01:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  311
Joined  2007-02-17

Wood ashes can be used as a bleaching agent.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 June 2010 12:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22
Myridon - 13 June 2010 01:15 PM

Wood ashes can be used as a bleaching agent.

So “ash blonde” might have originally arisen in the same way as “peroxide blonde”.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 June 2010 07:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  811
Joined  2007-06-20
bayard - 16 June 2010 12:48 PM

So “ash blonde” might have originally arisen in the same way as “peroxide blonde”.

I always assumed it was meant to indicate hair that was a mixture of pale blonde and “grey” (ie white) hairs, or at least hair that was a blonde colour with much less of a yellow component than usual, closer to the colour of paper ash. Am I wrong?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 June 2010 08:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1365
Joined  2007-01-29

I meant to say just no, but since the server was unable to receive my submission at this time, here it is again.  No.

Profile