Tyrolean musical instrument
Posted: 16 August 2010 08:38 PM   [ Ignore ]
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This was played at a Tyrolean music evening in Austria recently.  I think Fuchs Buam is the name of the group, but does anyone know the name of the instrument?  It’s a series of oblong pieces of wood joined together at the top and fastened to handles which you move up and down so that the bits of wood clap against each other.

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Posted: 17 August 2010 12:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I’ve seen one of these played in a Austrian band in Edinburgh, but have no idea what it’s called. I had a look at Fuchs Buam’s websites (they seem to have two) in the hope that there might be a useful pointer to somewhere, but alas, I’m none the wiser!

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Posted: 17 August 2010 04:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Possibly a version of the Japanese binzasara, “a traditional Japanese percussion instrument used in folk songs, rural dances and kabuki theatre. The instrument uses many pieces of wooden plates strung together with a cotton cord. With handles at both ends, the stack of wooden plates are played by moving them like a wave.”

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Posted: 17 August 2010 04:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think we should give it a name. I’m thinking “klapenspiel.”

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Posted: 17 August 2010 05:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I found it under the name kokiriko on some German-language websites. (Another different Japanese wooden percussion instrument.) Fuchs Buam is Bavarian German or its Austrian counterpart for The Fox Boys. Fuchs being their family name. Bua being ‘Junge, Sohn, Knabe’.

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Posted: 17 August 2010 05:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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aldiboronti - 17 August 2010 04:55 AM

Possibly a version of the Japanese binzasara

That does sound awfully like the thing I saw. Given that the band I saw (Edinburgh Fringe 2 or 3 years back) used electronic instruments as well as traditional stuff, it may well be that it was a binzasara and nothing to do with traditional Austrian music and equally nothing to do with what Eliza saw.

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