Whatever
Posted: 17 November 2010 05:16 PM   [ Ignore ]
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When did people begin using this word as a dismissive interjection?

Wikipedia says it was used in All in the Family. Was Archie an early populariser or an originator?

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Posted: 17 November 2010 08:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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My recollection is that Archie used “whatever” defensively and with some passion, whereas today’s users often use it dismissively with a touch of irony.  And wasn’t there a gap of about 20 years between the end of All in the Family and the rise of the ironic/dismissive “whatever”?

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Posted: 21 December 2010 10:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Archie’s use doesn’t really bind with how it is used today.  With different inflections and context of use, “whatever” seemed to have picked up its dismissive use in the mid 90s

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Posted: 21 December 2010 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Such memories are, of course, suspect, but I recall it from junior high school in southern California in the mid-late 1970s.

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Posted: 28 January 2011 06:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I would guess that this developed from the phrase “or whatever”, which goes back at least to the 1970s.  “The students can use test tubes or Bunsen burners or whatever” implies that it is not important to be more precise.  It also suggests that the speaker has little knowledge of, or interest in, chemistry.

“Or whatever” = it’s not worth being specific.
“Whatever” as a dismissive reply = it’s not worth talking about.

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Posted: 29 January 2011 07:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yeah I didn’t mean “it’s not worth talking about”. I meant the “whatever” that means “I don’t agree” or “I don’t believe you.”

“Honey, I only had a couple of beers.”
“WHATEVER!”

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Posted: 30 January 2011 06:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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OP Tipping - 29 January 2011 07:16 PM

Yeah I didn’t mean “it’s not worth talking about”. I meant the “whatever” that means “I don’t agree” or “I don’t believe you.”

“Honey, I only had a couple of beers.”
“WHATEVER!”

But isn’t that still the dismissive whatever? In other words, whether you did or didn’t have only a couple (and my guess is you didn’t) it’s not worth pursuing.

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Posted: 30 January 2011 07:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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"But isn’t that still the dismissive whatever? In other words, whether you did or didn’t have only a couple (and my guess is you didn’t) it’s not worth pursuing. “

Sort of, but something tells me that conversation is not over…

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Posted: 31 January 2011 07:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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but something tells me that conversation is not over…

Right again.

Such memories are, of course, suspect, but I recall it from junior high school in southern California in the mid-late 1970s.

I left SoCal at the very end of ‘73 and I don’t remember it, but San Diego was significantly behind LA in trends. I was about to say it was maybe a shortening of “whatever you say” and popularized by Zappa’s “Valley Girl” song, but there it is on wikipedia’s Valley girl article.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_girl

FWIW, I find it annoying and a little precious to have the title of an article use a cap on only the first letter of the first word, that is, unless otherwise called for. But I’ve been wrong before. It must be a trend the curve of which I am behind.

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Posted: 01 February 2011 02:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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FWIW, I find it annoying and a little precious to have the title of an article use a cap on only the first letter of the first word, that is, unless otherwise called for. But I’ve been wrong before. It must be a trend the curve of which I am behind.

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It’s WP policy. Makes sense to me: differentiates between valley girl and Valley Girl.

Of course, it still doesn’t differentiate between Milk and milk but you can’t have everything.

Back OT, in Australia “whatever you reckon” is a phrase of long standing.

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