ducks as an endearment
Posted: 03 December 2010 03:42 PM   [ Ignore ]
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To say “Thanks ever so much ducks” where did this endearment come from?

Thanks in advance for any info you may have!

elle

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Posted: 03 December 2010 04:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It dates to Elizabethan times. The first citation in the OED is from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. I have no clue why a duck.

(Why a no chicken. [rimshot])

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Posted: 04 December 2010 05:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Dave Wilton - 03 December 2010 04:15 PM


(Why a no chicken. [rimshot])

I saw Cocoanuts for the first time a few weeks ago. I’d never seen the routine in context before.  Priceless!

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Posted: 04 December 2010 06:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Diegogarcity. I watched it for the first time a few weeks ago as well. (Although I had seen clips of the “Why a duck?” routine before.)

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Posted: 04 December 2010 07:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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LOL. Where else but on YouTube.

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Posted: 04 December 2010 07:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I just learned that the coco in coconuts comes from a Spanish word meaning smiling face.

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Posted: 04 December 2010 08:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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OP Tipping - 04 December 2010 07:39 AM

I just learned that the coco in coconuts comes from a Spanish word meaning smiling face.

Actually, it’s more likely from Portuguese, which is the source for the Spanish (coco), French (coco), and Italian (cocco).  In both Portuguese and Spanish, the sense is more of “hobgoblin” or “ogre” or “bogeyman”—i.e., something giving fright to children—than simply “smiling face”.  The name of the fruit is believed to have been “coined” by members of Vasco da Gama’s expedition to India, when they came upon coconuts in Mozambique in 1498.

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Posted: 04 December 2010 11:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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In Chile, where I spent much of my childhood, the word for “bogeyman” was cuco, not coco

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Posted: 06 December 2010 01:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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So that’s where Coco the Clown got his name!

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