Logistics
Posted: 22 May 2007 07:27 PM   [ Ignore ]
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From Dictionary.com based on Random House Unabridged 2006:

Logistics [Origin: 1875–80; < F logistique quartermaster’s work, equiv. to log(er) to lodge, be quartered (said of troops) + -istique -istic; see -ics]
Lodge [Origin: 1175–1225; ME logge < OF loge < ML laubia, lobia; see lobby]
Lobby [Origin: 1545–55; < ML lobia, laubia covered way < OHG *laubia (later lauba) arbor, deriv. of laub leaf]
Leaf [Origin: bef. 900; ME leef, lef, OE léaf; c. D loof, G Laub, ON lauf, Goth laufs]

From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Ed

Logistics [French logistiques, from logistique, logic (perhaps influenced by loger, to quarter), from Medieval Latin logisticus, of calculation; see logistic.]
Logistic [Medieval Latin logisticus, of calculation, from Greek logistikos, skilled in calculating, from logistēs, calculator, from logizesthai, to calculate, from logos, reckoning, reason; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

Trouble in paradise, eh?
I invite general comments.

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Posted: 23 May 2007 06:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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You’re confusing “compare to” with “from” in several places in this chain.

For example, the French logistique is from loger, which means to lodge. But it is cognate with and not from the English word to lodge, so following that chain of English etymologies is not conclusive.

There does seem to be a dispute over the origins of the two French senses of logistique, one meaning the organization of supplies and the other logic. Depending on who you consult, the origin is given as one or the other (the OED agrees with Random House). There is no doubt that the English word comes from the French; it’s the origin of the French word that is in doubt.

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Posted: 23 May 2007 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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FTR: Van Dale agrees with AHD.

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Posted: 24 October 2008 02:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I just wondered whether the appalling “logistics solutions” buzzphrase (instead of “removals” or “freight haulage") had gained currency in the US , or indeed if that is whence it emanated, ( although I don’t remember ever seeing a removal truck with “logistics solutions “ emblazoned on the side during my time of residence in the US.)

Here in the UK, nobody simply transports goods or hauls freight any more, instead they offer “logistics solutions”.

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Posted: 24 October 2008 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I have not encountered the phrase “logistics solutions”, so I would say it’s not common in the US.

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Posted: 25 October 2008 04:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I see logistics solutions all the time (in the US), but it seems to be confined to business jargon. I don’t think moving companies that target households would use it in ads here. Office movers and freight companies use it to mean they will coordinate timing, multiple stops/locations, etc. down to minute details, rather than just saying they will show up one day and move your junk from point A to point B.

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Posted: 25 October 2008 06:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Yes, it’s rather common in US business-speak.

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Posted: 25 October 2008 07:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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The “solutions” meme/snowclone/whatever is so common in company names and mission statements in the UK, the satirical magazine Private Eye makes a regular feature of the more ridiculous examples. Recent spots include “Accommodation Solutions” - apartments and flats; “demand responsive transport solutions” -taxi cabs; “Fabric Display Solutions” - flags; “Innovative Solutions for Wound Management” - bandages; and “Mailing Solutions” - brown paper.

Returning to our muttons, I see that while Eric Partridge in Origins derives logistics, “that modern horror” (his words, from 1966) directly from French l’art logistique, “quartermastery”, from logis, a lodging, he suggests that “logistic” from Greek logos was “probably influential” in its formation. But if true, that doesn’t answer the question whether the influence from logos came at the time the French word logistique was coined from logis, or when logistique entered English ...

[ Edited: 25 October 2008 07:40 AM by Zythophile ]
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