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Hawk / hauck / hock a louie / loogie / lunger / loogin
Posted: 10 February 2011 11:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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For the rest of us in the UK and elsewhere:

Emily Litella was an elderly woman with a hearing problem who made regular appearances on SNL’s Weekend Update op-ed segment in the late 1970s. Attired in a frumpy dress and sweater, Litella was introduced with professional dignity by the news anchors, who could sometimes be seen cringing slightly in anticipation of the verbal faux pas they knew would follow.

from http://wapedia.mobi/en/Emily_Litella

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Posted: 11 February 2011 09:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Eliza has the correct character, but for my purposes the key point about Emily Litella was not that she was an elderly, hard-of-hearing woman, but that she was noted for delivering diatribes based on some fundamental misunderstanding, and when her error was eventually pointed out, she would smile at the camera and say, “Never mind.”

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Posted: 11 February 2011 05:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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And then it got quiet. The internet is full of Emily Litellas who can’t bring themselves to say “Never mind.”
---

I am a man of few virtues but I will say “thanks” when corrected.

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Posted: 12 February 2011 11:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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OP Tipping - 11 February 2011 05:41 PM


DO tell…

DNFTT, besides we’ve been there, done that, wiped the floor with it...

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Posted: 28 April 2014 08:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Most of this sounds like pure speculation, which surprises me.  I expected more with this search/site.  I can’t offer improved origin insight, but I can correct one inaccurate implication in the above information:  Hock a Loogie (or whatever spelling) was common school yard chatter in Southern California at least as early as the late 1950s, I can attest to personally.  I will speculate use much earlier than that, given my ‘dozen’ years older brother’s comments.  Additional logical speculation dictates that unless this is of Spanish/Mexican origins (doubtful?), it would have migrated here from earlier westward migrations, possibly postwar from the American Midwest.
Regarding above speculations about modifications or incorporation of imported slang, don’t forget that we experienced the importation of A LOT of foreign artifacts with the return of troops from overseas following WWII.  I wouldn’t rule out post war (either I or II) being a ‘possible’ source for the American version of this slang.  Just as logical is the previous pondering which leaned upon our being a melting-pot of immigrant cultures/languages.  I like the notion of northern European immigrant origination (at least for US).  I am disappointed however that this site did not provide me the “origins” info I was hoping for (factual references, dates of usage, etc.).  Oh well, it was interesting reading (except for the egocentric sniping back & forth).  Thanks for the opinions.

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Posted: 28 April 2014 12:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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If there’s one thing wrong with this site, it’s that its members are too civilized, and too easily fall prey to the deliberately provocative language of characters like “Peter Zelchenko”, and now this “dnick”. I wouldn’t be surprised if both of them were two more aspects of that same troll who’s been buzzing around the site recently. Even if they are both genuine bona fide posters (which I don’t believe for a moment --- it’s no coincidence that both turned up at just the same time, on the same thread)—all I have to say to either of them is “Go away, and don’t come back.”

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Posted: 28 April 2014 01:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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There’s no reason to believe that dnick is a sockpuppet. Nor would I place his post in the category of “troll.” People are free to criticize my postings, and I don’t usually take offense. In this case, I find nothing combative or trollish about dnick’s comment.

Hock a Loogie (or whatever spelling) was common school yard chatter in Southern California at least as early as the late 1950s, I can attest to personally.

A date in the 1950s is not unreasonable. The 1970/85 dates are when it is first recorded in print. Slang often exists in oral use for a decade or two before being recorded. But that said, I wouldn’t put too much reliance on memory. Memory is extremely malleable. We literally recreate our memories each time we remember an event, and our recollection changes each time. Specific words used are especially vulnerable to change, with anachronistic phrasings being inserted.

Additional logical speculation dictates that unless this is of Spanish/Mexican origins (doubtful?), it would have migrated here from earlier westward migrations, possibly postwar from the American Midwest.

There’s no reason to associate the term with any “migration.” The phrase isn’t a regional one.

I am disappointed however that this site did not provide me the “origins” info I was hoping for (factual references, dates of usage, etc.).

I’m reasonably sure the Big List entry does just this.

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Posted: 28 April 2014 07:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Dave Wilton - 28 April 2014 01:49 PM

There’s no reason to believe that dnick is a sockpuppet. Nor would I place his post in the category of “troll.” People are free to criticize my postings, and I don’t usually take offense. In this case, I find nothing combative or trollish about dnick’s comment.

Hock a Loogie (or whatever spelling) was common school yard chatter in Southern California at least as early as the late 1950s, I can attest to personally.

A date in the 1950s is not unreasonable. The 1970/85 dates are when it is first recorded in print. Slang often exists in oral use for a decade or two before being recorded. But that said, I wouldn’t put too much reliance on memory. Memory is extremely malleable. We literally recreate our memories each time we remember an event, and our recollection changes each time. Specific words used are especially vulnerable to change, with anachronistic phrasings being inserted.

Additional logical speculation dictates that unless this is of Spanish/Mexican origins (doubtful?), it would have migrated here from earlier westward migrations, possibly postwar from the American Midwest.

There’s no reason to associate the term with any “migration.” The phrase isn’t a regional one.

I am disappointed however that this site did not provide me the “origins” info I was hoping for (factual references, dates of usage, etc.).

I’m reasonably sure the Big List entry does just this.

Thank You Dave for your respectful exchange.  I did not intend to be rude with my criticism, but was admittedly put off by the pettiness that was in much of what I read here.  I do appreciate intelligent differences of opinion . . . and I am admittedly not in any way expert in the area of your forum’s focus.  In fact, I am/was quite the casual encounter for your site.  It seems Lionello is either paranoid or just can’t handle the truth when it’s a bit sour. 
With respect to your comments, I will relent from my complaint of no references.  I consider them weak, but they ARE references.  My apologies. 
Regarding the memory thing . . . I can assure you this is not one of those revisionist memory cases.  I was one of those young boys who used to have contests with this hocking thing at Laurel Elementary in Los Alamitos, Ca.; this would have been roughly 1959.  My still-close childhood friend & I mused about this just Sunday. 
And . . . Lionello ‘might’ be pleased to know that he escaped a repeat encounter with whatever troll nemesis he is so anxious about.  In truth, my 26 year old son used this term/phrase (hocked up a big loogie) Sunday, to which I expressed amazement that he had ever heard, much less used, the term.  I had not heard it in years myself.  After discussing with my same-age friend (now brother-in-law) during a coincidental phone call, I decided I had to know the origins of the term (loogie).  ‘Queried my son briefly . . . of course he had no clue.  So I made a mental note to Google the word origin of Loogie. 
So.......  we got to enjoy the pleasure of this exchange by simple happenstance, and certainly with no ill intentions.  It has been interesting.  AND, Lionello can sleep tight knowing he’s heard the last from me.  I’m outta here, and I doubt I’ll have occasion to return.  It’s been real.

Thanks Again Dave,

Dan (the d in dnick) . . . Lionello can call me Notatroll.  He/she really needs to lighten up.  Smiles.

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Posted: 28 April 2014 07:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Dave Wilton - 28 April 2014 01:49 PM

There’s no reason to believe that dnick is a sockpuppet.

Oh Yeah......... what the hell is a sockpuppet??  I mean you know, other than a . . . . you know . . . sock puppet.

:o)

Dan

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Posted: 28 April 2014 09:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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If you’re not a troll, dnick, I apologize for misjudging you, and take back what I said about “go away”. This site is extremely vulnerable to trolls, because the genuine posters here are such easy prey. I love them, and hate to see them provoked and manipulated by people whose chief pleasure is to spoil. If that’s paranoia, call me paranoid.

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Posted: 29 April 2014 02:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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In internet usage a sock puppet is a personality put on by someone, often with the intent of providing what appears to be an independent, confirmatory voice to the sock puppeteer’s rantings.

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Posted: 29 April 2014 07:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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It seems Lionello is either paranoid or just can’t handle the truth when it’s a bit sour.

What you believe is not “the truth,” it’s just what you believe.  Furthermore, “you can’t handle the truth” is a childish attitude that I would have thought had been buried forever by this.

Regarding the memory thing . . . I can assure you this is not one of those revisionist memory cases.

The whole point about revisionist memory is that you can’t tell it from the real thing.  Of course you’re sure your memory is accurate; everybody thinks that about their memories unless they learn and assimilate the facts about how memory works (for one thing, every time you “access” a memory it changes a little more).  I had an unforgettable (heh) lesson in this when my wife and I were talking about our first meeting, in Grand Central, and we discovered we remembered having met on opposite sides of the information booth.  At first I thought it was just a matter of perspective or something, but we actually went to the station and positioned ourselves where we remembered our first meeting, and it was two different places.  Each of us was absolutely convinced of our version.  Both of us could not be right.  There was no way of determining the truth.  Ergo: memory, even rock-solid memory, is unreliable.

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Posted: 29 April 2014 08:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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I had a similar exchange with my sister-in-law a few weeks ago. I had engraved in my memory an event that happened on the occasion that we first met. I made a rather dark quip about a current event, and my sister-in-law laughed. At that moment I knew that I liked her and that my brother had found a keeper.

I mentioned this to my sister-in-law and she told me that it was not the case. I had made the quip and she had laughed, but it had occurred years later, not the first time we met. I went back over the timelines, and sure enough she was right. I had rewritten the timelines in my memory, conflating two different events. What I would have been prepared to swear to as utterly correct, was in fact wrong.

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