Technological Roots
Posted: 06 June 2007 06:46 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hey everyone, i was wondering if anyone could help me out with the origin of the word ‘technology’ ?
thx loads :-)

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Posted: 06 June 2007 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The Oxford English Dictionary gives:

[ad. Gr. {tau}{epsilon}{chi}{nu}{omicron}{lambda}{omicron}{gamma}{iota}{alpha} systematic treatment (of grammar, etc.), f. {tau}{epsilon}{chi}{nu}{eta} art, craft: see -LOGY. So F. technologie (1812 in Hatz.-Darm.).]

1. a. A discourse or treatise on an art or arts; the scientific study of the practical or industrial arts.
1615 BUCK Third Univ. Eng. xlviii, An apt close of this general Technologie.

I’ve given the oldest meaning of the word too.  Sorry about spelling out the Greek letters, I don’t know how to render them on this keyboard.

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Posted: 07 June 2007 04:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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A general suggestion to anyone quoting the OED or other places that use Greek type: replace the Greek letters by transliterations.  Thus:

[ad. Gr. tekhnologia systematic treatment (of grammar, etc.), f. tekhne art, craft

If you can’t or don’t want to do that, either find another online source (like Merriam-Webster) or leave the question for someone else to answer, because things like “{tau}{epsilon}{chi}{nu}{omicron}{lambda}{omicron}{gamma}{iota}{alpha} systematic treatment (of grammar, etc.), f. {tau}{epsilon}{chi}{nu}{eta}” don’t really do anyone any good.

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Posted: 07 June 2007 06:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Unlike the old Ezboard, this forum supports unicode characters and the like. If you’re intent on using the actual Greek letters, it’s easy to do--but you can’t simply copy and past them from the OED. If you use windows, just use the Character Map utility to call up the proper characters. I don’t know how to do it on a Mac, but it should be equally easy.

[ad. Gr. τεχνογια systematic treatment (of grammar, etc.), f. τεχνη art, craft: see -LOGY. So F. technologie (1812 in Hatz.-Darm.).]

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Posted: 07 June 2007 08:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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languagehat - 07 June 2007 04:34 AM

A general suggestion to anyone quoting the OED or other places that use Greek type: replace the Greek letters by transliterations.  Thus:

[ad. Gr. tekhnologia systematic treatment (of grammar, etc.), f. tekhne art, craft

If you can’t or don’t want to do that, either find another online source (like Merriam-Webster) or leave the question for someone else to answer,

Do you mean it is possible to render Greek characters on this board?

because things like “{tau}{epsilon}{chi}{nu}{omicron}{lambda}{omicron}{gamma}{iota}{alpha} systematic treatment (of grammar, etc.), f. {tau}{epsilon}{chi}{nu}{eta}” don’t really do anyone any good.

No, come to think of it, I don’t think they do. {gamma}-, bayard, for lack of effort.

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Posted: 07 June 2007 09:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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There’s a shortcut that will save you some hunting around for the Greek letters on your keyboard or program menus. Simply take the Greek name of the letters in lowercase, put an ampersand in front of each and a semicolon behind, and it should render correctly:

τεχνολογια

becomes

τεχνολογια

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Posted: 07 June 2007 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Grant, α ++ for that helpful reply, thanks.

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Posted: 07 June 2007 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Yes, a very neat trick!

Works for a couple of the Old English characters too:

þ ð

þ ð

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Posted: 07 June 2007 01:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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[low bow to Grant]

We are in your debt, sir.

This is such useful information that I would suggest it be put in the “Advice on Posting” sticky thread in the meta-discussions.

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Posted: 07 June 2007 04:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I agree.  Brilliant!

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Posted: 09 June 2007 04:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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for a complete list of what you can do…

http://www.alanwood.net/demos/wgl4.html

and click on the “HTML 4 character entity references “ link for a full list.

and http://www.unics.uni-hannover.de/nhtcapri/greek.win

if you really want to stretch you browser and display…

[ Edited: 09 June 2007 04:57 AM by steve_g ]
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Posted: 23 August 2011 06:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Actually, “technology” is a critically important word in our human language. It’s composed of three parts, and because of its age needs to be heard as well as seen:  “tek” - “nai” - “logos”

First, one need understand that long before we invented written language, we employed sounds as a means of communications (as do many other animals on our planet). A baby’s primal scream, laughter, a moan of pleasure . . . all of these have become part of our language. Some of these sounds derive from other sounds occurring ‘naturally’—without human intervention . . . thunder, bird call, waterfalls.  Marking one of our human ‘main events’ is the sound of two stones striking together: “tek” or “click” or “tick” or “ch.” The “Stone Age” has been so labelled because of the tremendous leap forward we took when we learned the mastery of this hard, brittle, massive material . . . and we’re talking two to three million years ago.  As a teacher in those days, we needed to communicate to our engineering students that we want them to click two stones together, “Like this!” TEK!  While showing them how it’s done and what the results should be.  So to say, “it’s all in the wrist.” When the student’s first try fails, we hand her another pair of stones and say “Tek” again, until she gets it right.  “Yum,” you might say, like “Mom, now we can skin the squirrel before we eat it!”

“Tek” is the onomatopoeic word for chipping stone.  And life hasn’t been the same ever since.

“Nai” is simply the Greek affirmative . . . like, “Yes, you got it right!” When we tek until the results are correct, we have mastered the “tek-nai” or in English, “technique.” And compared to almost every other sign of life, stone tools and stone monuments stand the test of time better than drawings on papyrus or patterns in the sand.  When we engineered our new ability to write—many, many years later—chipping patterns into stone—as with grave markers—became the preferred method for longevity. These patterns are known as “logos” or “characters.” Recording events this way, “logging” as we say, has proven so valuable that today we’ll say “it is written” to justify almost anything.  And to mark the event, one of our first logos was the ‘letter’ “X”—denoting the pattern of our hands and arms as we strike the lower stone with the upper.  This logo has become known as “man’s mark” and still appears on contracts and is recognized as a symbol of a signatory’s presence at the signing of a document.

Over time, just as with dialects, the logo X has been ‘adjusted’ into the logo “t” and the logo “k.” When the handwritten X was scribbled in charcoal by a right-handed cleric, the northeastward stroke was bold and uniform, while the southeastward-bound stroke was lighter at first and darker as it finished, creating the letter “tau” but canted to the left. Careless or casual formation of X led to the deformed logo K . . . all of which—T, K and X—are representative of the sound of striking.  A clock goes “tick, tock” because its mechanism makes slightly different sounds at each end of the pendulum swing.  Listening to a precision chronograph today, we hear simple “tick, tick” but those early stone-and-wood timepieces were not so carefully constructed.

Seen this way, “technology” is literally the written (recorded) technique (or process) for creating (there’’s that “K” sound again) something. In the kitchen we would call this a recipe, giving the exact measures and strokes and temperature and time that will produce the same product every time. In engineering, we would call it a “process specification.” If it’s written down (logged) and spells out a technique (teknai) for success, then it is—by definition—technology.  If it is an object you carry around, like a cell phone, it is a “tool” or a “product.”

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Posted: 24 August 2011 05:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I’m not sure whether the above is the work of a crackpot or a jokester, but either way it should not be taken seriously.

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Posted: 24 August 2011 06:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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DNFTT I’d say.

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Posted: 24 August 2011 01:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I think it is feeding us.

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