degermanisation
Posted: 02 May 2011 10:31 PM   [ Ignore ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3062
Joined  2007-02-26

During (and to some extent after) WWI, certain things were renamed to remove connection with the suddenly unpopular Germans.

The British Royal family was renamed Windsor, German Gardens was renamed Belgian Gardens.

German shepherds were dubbed Alsatians.

German sausage took various new names… Devon, Strasbourg, luncheon meat. Where I grew up (and, it seems, only where I grew up) it was called Windsor sausage. I tried a joke about Princess Eugenie’s hat based on this term but it fell rather flat because no one in the audience had heard of Windsor sausage.

Any other examples of deGermanisation?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2011 12:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  231
Joined  2008-07-19

German silver -> nickel silver

Dresden bun (a variety of iced bun with a glacé cherry on top) -> Belgian bun

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2011 12:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  821
Joined  2007-03-01

At the beginning of the Great War my local pub just up the hill from Chatham Royal Naval Dockyard, which had been called The King of Prussia for more than a century (in the 1690s it had been The Prince of Orange), had its windows stoned by ‘patriotic’ neighbours and was hastily re-christened The King George V, which name it retains to this day.  But another pub in Chatham High Street, the Von Alten, (named after the commander of the King’s German Legion at Waterloo, Graf Karl von Alten) only camouflaged itself very lightly for the duration as the John Alten, and resumed its real name shortly after 1918.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2011 03:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4695
Joined  2007-01-03

Here in the US, sauerkraut became victory cabbage, or so the popular accounts would have it.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2011 05:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  407
Joined  2007-02-14

Not just Windsor, but also Mountbatten from Battenberg.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2011 05:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  333
Joined  2007-02-13

I’d always thought the Katzenjammer Kids comic strip was converted to the Captain and the Kids because of World War I, but a quick check of Wikipedia indicates the name change was really over a copyright squabble, and that the two coexisted in rival newspapers for a long time.  However, Wikipedia says the Katzenjammer Kids was briefly renamed the Shenanigan Kids toward the end of the war in 1918.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2011 06:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1263
Joined  2007-03-21

In my experience, a lot of the pronunciations of German words were changed, especially cities and street names.

For example, a town near where I live was changed to New BER-lin (the vowel “i” is really a schwa).

edit: the pronunciation was changed during WWII according to this wiki article. And that is my sense of the history as well. Not many changes during and after WWI but many changes during and after WWII.

I serve a German background congregation and they didn’t changed to English until late in the 30s despite pressure from the likes of Reinhold Niebuhr during WWI.

[ Edited: 03 May 2011 06:59 AM by Oecolampadius ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2011 11:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  26
Joined  2007-04-09

The “German American Insurance Company” changed its name during WWI to the “Great American Insurance Company.”

Not entirely coincidentally, it currently possesses the naming rights to the Cincinnati Reds’ “Great American Ball Park”—the team that renamed itself the Cincinnati “Redlegs” during the 1950s Red Scare.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 May 2011 04:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  11
Joined  2011-01-28

Bechstein Hall, a concert hall in London, was renamed Wigmore Hall in WWI, after the name of the street in which it is located.

I would be interested to know whether there was any pressure to rename the city of Bismarck, North Dakota, in either world war.  It was named after the 19th-century German chancellor particularly associated with militarism and German expansion.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 May 2011 07:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3469
Joined  2007-01-29

the pronunciation was changed during WWII according to this wiki article

I added a “Citation needed” tag to that Wikipedia article; the WWII story sounds very dubious.  Many, if not most, European place names were heavily anglicized when borrowed (Milan “MY-lan,” etc.), and I see no reason this would be any different.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 May 2011 03:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  811
Joined  2007-06-20

The Anglo-Bavarian Brewery in Shepton Mallet, Somerset dropped the -Bavarian bit of its name in the First World War, to become the Anglo Brewery. The site is now the Anglo Trading Estate. Another German who managed to survive the patriotic purge that saw many “King of Prussia” pubs change their names was the Prince Blucher in Twickenham, still with us today (and a very fine pub it is too …)

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ Exfiltrate      False MLK Quote ››