final -s in all persons in present tense (English)
Posted: 07 May 2011 02:41 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Recently on the Lowlands Languages listserv, the topic of final -s inflection on all persons rather than just the 3rd singular came up. I have searched for several years for a discussion in a book on this and cannot find it. Then someone from Worcester City in England wrote in and said that way of speaking was quite common in her area. Another person mentioned Norwich as the site of a study done on this. On the old list I recall this topic being discussed. Does anyone have information to add, esp a citation?
Pat Barrett

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Posted: 08 May 2011 04:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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This reminds me of a satirical 18th-century verse about a famous physician, John Coakley Lettsom (1744-1815), who signed his name ‘I. Lettsom’ (the ‘I’ presumably stood for Iohannes, the Latinized form of John):

When any sick to me apply,
I physics, bleeds and sweats ‘em;
If after that, they choose to die,
What’s that to me? - I. Lettsom.

So it seems that the final -s in the first person was familiar enough in the 18th century to enable the pun on Lettsom’s name.

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Posted: 08 May 2011 04:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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"Yes, I likes it,” she replied.

David Copperfield.

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Posted: 30 June 2011 02:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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from Southern Britain - Dorset (traditional, n.d.)

Be oi Baarkshire? Be oi booggery!
Oi do come from Wareham,
Where the girls wears calico knicks,
And oi knaows ‘ow to tear ‘em.

(I think this has come up before. Sorry if I’m being repetitious)

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Posted: 01 July 2011 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Not just Worcestershire and Norfolk.  It’s fairly common in north east England to hear the first person +s ending when narrating events.  eg “I goes in and asks her for some money before I tells her why I needs it.” My guess is it’s fairly widespread in England.

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Posted: 01 July 2011 12:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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ya pays yur money and ya takes yur chances.

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Posted: 14 July 2011 07:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Why’s this here, then? Seems like fine main discussion board material.

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Posted: 15 July 2011 05:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Isn’t this the main discussion board?  Where am I??

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Posted: 15 July 2011 05:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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“That’s all I can stands, and I can’t stands no more!” - Popeye, sometime after 1933

“I wants a bouquet of flowers for my sweet patatootie.” - Popeye, Oct 1933

I thought those cartoons relied heavily on the popular shared experience (slang, etc) of those times.  If so, the extra “s” was popular in the US around the mid nineteen-thirties.

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Posted: 15 July 2011 06:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Isn’t this the main discussion board?  Where am I??

The thread was started in the Meta board, but I moved it to the main board long ago. I left a “ghost” pointer on the Meta board, however. OP Tipping must have followed that link.

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Posted: 15 July 2011 08:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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That’s exactly what happened. Now I look like some kind of crazy person.

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Posted: 15 July 2011 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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That’s OK—you may be crazy, but you’re our kind of crazy!

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