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Burger… is it changing? 
Posted: 25 June 2007 07:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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The status of Buerger was found in, I believe, most European towns - the English equivalent was Burgess

Very instructive, Zythophile ---thank you. I realize, now, that those six unfortunates whom I was taught as a child to call “The Burghers of Calais”, could more accurately be referred to as “The Burgesses of Calais”. A little Internet research (O brave new world, that has the Internet in it!) shows that, in fact, they are so referred to, in Bourchier’s sixteenth-century translation of Froissart’s Chronicles

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Posted: 25 June 2007 09:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I’ve come across this in recent British journalism over the past 30 years, something like “The staid burghers of Tunbridge Wells were unimpressed by the influx of punk fans/gypsies/dole spongers/foreigners/immigrant workers”. “Staid” always goes with “burgher” in this context and the intention of the journalist is always ironic or sarcastic, pointing out the burghers’ narrow-mindedness. I always took the burghers to mean Tory councillors but I suppose it could also mean people like influential throwbacks who still call themselves Captains of Industry

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