HD: Words of 1911
Posted: 24 May 2011 03:32 AM   [ Ignore ]
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A new series

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Posted: 24 May 2011 05:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Great stuff!  I look forward to future installments.

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Posted: 24 May 2011 06:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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So what was the brassiere called previously?

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Posted: 24 May 2011 06:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Apparently “bust supporter”; see the Wikipedia history.

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Posted: 24 May 2011 08:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Excellent idea! Doubtless there’ll be more surprises.

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Posted: 24 May 2011 01:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Good work, Dave! More power to you. i hope you keep it up.

BTW: Juzgado is not only Mexican Spanish - it’s a venerable Spanish word which probably antedates Mexico, meaning “a tribunal” or “the place where a tribunal meets”.

I suspect that “Hoosegow” may not be difficult to antedate by a few years. I would look in the works of early writers of Western stories, such as Owen Wister, Clarence E. Mulford, etc. --- possiblty even earlier, in the dime novels of the 19th century.

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Posted: 24 May 2011 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Yes, great idea, Dave.

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Posted: 24 May 2011 02:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’ll be reading it. 

I like fireworks!

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Posted: 24 May 2011 04:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Apparently “bust supporter”

Bodice was also used.

The idea was inspired by a post to ADS-L asking for a list of words coined in the last 100 years. That got me thinking…

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Posted: 25 May 2011 04:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Bodice was also used.

Yes, but it was ambiguous, meaning primarily the upper part of a woman’s dress.

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Posted: 25 May 2011 04:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Ripper! as they say in my country.

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Posted: 25 May 2011 08:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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OP Tipping - 25 May 2011 04:48 AM

Ripper! as they say in my country.

Tsk tsk, OP - that’s “historical single-title romance”, if you please.

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Posted: 26 May 2011 01:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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lionello - 24 May 2011 01:46 PM

Good work, Dave! More power to you. i hope you keep it up.

BTW: Juzgado is not only Mexican Spanish - it’s a venerable Spanish word which probably antedates Mexico, meaning “a tribunal” or “the place where a tribunal meets”.

I suspect that “Hoosegow” may not be difficult to antedate by a few years. I would look in the works of early writers of Western stories, such as Owen Wister, Clarence E. Mulford, etc. --- possiblty even earlier, in the dime novels of the 19th century.

Absolutely on the mark, Lionello.  Dave quotes--I assume--the OED in calling juzgao Mexican Spanish.  That’s incorrect.  It’s a common mispronunciation of
juzgado, not only in Mexico but throughout many parts of the Spanish speaking world.  Juzgao, the colloquial pronunciation, is not to be found in the DRAE, nor in the Breve Diccionario de mexicanismos of the Mexican academy of the language.  All that said, it does seem to be a logical origin of the English word.

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Posted: 26 May 2011 09:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Sen-Sen, n. The brand name for a mint used to cover up the breath of generations of teenagers and alcoholics was trademarked in 1911.

They stole my surname (twice) to cover up bad breath a hundred years ago! Sacrilegious!!! Whom do I sue?

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Posted: 27 May 2011 03:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Dave quotes--I assume--the OED in calling juzgao Mexican Spanish.  That’s incorrect.  It’s a common mispronunciation of
juzgado, not only in Mexico but throughout many parts of the Spanish speaking world.

So it’s not Mexican Spanish, even though it’s so pronounced in Mexico? It may not be standard, but it is most certainly Mexican Spanish.  (Plus we’re talking about the dialect of a century ago, not today. You have to take that into account. It may have changed.) And yes, it is used elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking world, but the route into English is via Mexican Spanish.

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Posted: 27 May 2011 05:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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It’s a common mispronunciation of juzgado

No it’s not, it is (as you later write) a colloquial pronunciation.  “Not officially sanctioned” does not equal “incorrect.”

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