HD: 1913 Words
Posted: 06 June 2011 04:23 AM   [ Ignore ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4478
Joined  2007-01-03

Another week, another year

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 June 2011 06:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2893
Joined  2007-02-26

seaplane, n. The aviation words continue to pile up. The first cite in the OED for this one is by Winston Churchill, the first lord of the Admiralty at the time: “We have decided to call the naval hydroplane a seaplane, and the ordinary aeroplane or school machine, which we use in the Navy, simply a plane.”
---

What distinction is being made here?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 June 2011 06:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  429
Joined  2007-02-14

As I understand it, in 1913 the Royal Navy uses two types of aiplanes;
1: special planes that can land on water (with floats or flying boats), hence-forward to be called ‘seaplane’.
2: ordinary planes (with just wheels) hence-forward to be called plainly ‘plane’.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 June 2011 07:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  803
Joined  2007-06-20

Salmonella, n. The name for the pathogenic bacteria was coined in French in 1900, but it took until 1913 for the name to start appearing in English-language journals. It’s after American pathologist Daniel Elmer Salmon (1850–1914).

Well, there’s a thing. Possibly because there was a famous outbreak in the UK in the 1970s of botulism involving tins of infected salmon (botulism, of course, taking its name from the Latin for “sausage"), I had somehow gained the idea that salmonella must be so-called because you could pick it up from infected salmon. Now (thanks, Dave) I know better …

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 June 2011 07:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1190
Joined  2007-04-28

A Japanese man I was teaching a few years ago told me about gravure idols there. He mentioned rotogravure (knowing it was a photographic process which was more then I could say) in explaining it which I only knew from a Ringo Starr LP Ringo’s Rotogravure. I looked it up then and again now:

A gravure idol (グラビアアイドル gurabia aidoru?), often abbreviated to gradol (グラドル guradoru?),[15] is a Japanese female model who primarily models on magazines, especially those marketed to men, photobooks or DVDs. Gravure idols, in most cases, emphasize their sexual attractiveness and often model in swimsuits.
“Gravure” (グラビア) is a Wasei-eigo term derived from “Rotogravure”, which is a type of intaglio printing process that was once a staple of newspaper photo features.

from wikipedia model entry which refuses to link. Interesting the word has flourished there if only in a truncated form and that my source knew rotogravure.

Entering gravure idol in google images will give you an idea though I wouldn’t recommend it. Much.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 June 2011 09:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3337
Joined  2007-01-29

A couple of minor edits: you have “Electra” in ital rather than bold, and s.v. rotogravure you have “showing the paper being feed [s/b fed] through the rotogravure.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 June 2011 04:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4478
Joined  2007-01-03

Corrected, thanks.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 June 2011 11:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  334
Joined  2007-02-13

Two big surprises for me.  Like Dave, I would have thought air cavalry was much newer.  OTOH, I would have guessed fifty-fifty to have been older.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 June 2011 10:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  68
Joined  2010-12-20

Bangalore torpedo. Though it’s practically my backyard, I’d never heard the term before. Dumdum bullet (the waxed or larded Enfield cartridge that had started the so-called sepoy mutiny), Dumdum dawai (= medicine)--also called lathi-charge--physical assault of an unruly mob by law enforcers with stout canes, Calcutta cocktail (glass-ball-stoppered soda water bottle, unopened but shaken vigorously and then hurled amidst a crowd by miscreants) etc are well-known in the not-so-old Indian arsenal ... but old Bangalore torpedo is new to me.  Thanks, Dave!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 June 2011 03:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4478
Joined  2007-01-03

Anyone who has watched a few WWII movies will know what a Bangalore torpedo is. There featured in the opening scenes of Saving Private Ryan, for example, with Tom Hanks shouting things like “Bring up the Bangalores.”

But dum dum bullets have nothing to do with the Sepoy rebellion. Dum dums came along about a half century later. There are named for the town/neighborhood in Kolkata, after the location of the British arsenal where they were first manufactured.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 June 2011 12:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  634
Joined  2011-04-10

Here, for all these years, I thought “salmonella” was derived from the salmon-orange color of colonial masses of the little beasties. 

An excellent series, Dave. 

You might also want to check grammar on:

“quahog, v. I must confess, quahog is one of favorite words, but since it is simply the verbing of a well-established noun, I probably would not have included it if it hadn’t begun with Q, and there are so few Q words in general...”

bolding by sobiest…

[ Edited: 08 June 2011 03:05 PM by sobiest ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 June 2011 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4478
Joined  2007-01-03

Corrected, thanks.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 June 2011 02:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  68
Joined  2010-12-20

Posted by Dave Wilton 08 June
But dum dum bullets have nothing to do with the Sepoy rebellion. Dum dums came along about a half century later. There are named for the town/neighborhood in Kolkata, after the location of the British arsenal where they were first manufactured.


The Royal Armoury at Dumdum, then a neighbouring town of Calcutta (Kolkata) but now a suburb, pre-dates the Mutiny and definitely the expanding bullets. The allegedly lard-coated Enfield bullets that had triggered the uprising were also from the same armoury and, thanks to local media, had acquired the same sobriquet. Sambad Prabhakar, a Bengali weekly (established 1831), later a daily (since 1839) and published from Kolkata, had called the then Enfield ammo “Damdam (to rhyme with ‘pom pom’) bullet” in one of its post-Mutiny issues. The sobriquet is, therefore, older than the expanding bullets, if not as famous. It’s not clear whether the term was in common use or not but many Indians have used it in the sense of the Mutiny trigger ever since. Its lard-coating, according to British authority, was a myth. 
Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 June 2011 02:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4478
Joined  2007-01-03

You ought to submit those post-Mutiny citations to the OED. They don’t have anything on dum-dum referring to bullets from that period.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 June 2011 04:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  68
Joined  2010-12-20

Will do as soon as I visit the National Library and get a copy. That would be week after next.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 June 2011 06:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3337
Joined  2007-01-29

I’m confused.  As far as I can tell, Sambad Prabhakar was in Bengali, so how can it be a source for English words?

Profile