stoked
Posted: 10 June 2011 09:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
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From etymonline Stoked “enthusiastic” first recorded 1902; revived in surfer slang 1963.

Still current usage amongst many of the old codgers I know, but I’d like to know more about the 1902 record if anyone has it handy or has anything more to say about this bitchin word.

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Posted: 11 June 2011 02:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Etymonline got this one wrong. The 1902 cite refers to stoking a furnace, not enthusiasm. From the OED:

1902 Daily Chron. 2 May 6/1 Hand-stoked retorts were shut down, and now the whole of the gas is to be manufactured in inclined or mechanically stoked retorts.
1963 Observer 13 Oct. 15/6, I hate to think of the next kid that gets stoked on board ridingā€„and wins a world championship and nobody even knows him.

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Posted: 11 June 2011 05:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Fascinating, I hadn’t realized that the verb stoke, as in to stoke the fire, was a back-formation from the noun stoker, but so it is. The noun, according to OED, comes directly from the Dutch verb stoken. Here’s the nitty-gritty:

stoke, v.2 Back-formation < stoker n.

stoker, n.  < Dutch stoker, agent-n. < stoken to feed (a fire), to stoke.

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Posted: 11 June 2011 07:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Sounds like something that might happen to a bram.

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Posted: 11 June 2011 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Words and phrases having something to do with “fire” (such as “stoke"--or am I too bold here?) seem to me to appear frequently in reference to emotional state, such as feelings, especially of passion:  “burning,” “fired up,” “fired his imagination,” “hot and bothered,” “fiery personality,” “firebrand,” “blazing,” and “burning brightly,” etc.

etymonline offers:

...Fire applied in English to passions, feelings, from mid-14c…

It was not too long ago that fire was considered to be a basic or a “classical element.” I seem to recall that as a classical element, “fire” was sometimes considered to be “animate” or “alive” i.e., “having life,” or the stuff of life, “spirit.” If so with “fire,” might the other classical elements (water, air, earth, and, sometimes, aether or “space") offer up similarly rooted words and phrases easily related to feelings and passion, embedded in our lexicon?  They almost seem to, though mildly and to a much lesser degree than “fire” upon cursory investigation.  “Airy spirit,” “air head,” “space cowboy,” “spaced out,” “space cadet,” etc.  This may be a rich area for further investigation. 

It may be too much to expect that ideas or concepts having root in or something common in general with the other classical elements have extensive association with words and phrases describing spirit, passion, or emotional state such as I suspect with things having to do with “fire.” Such as “stoke.” [WAG]

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