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Posted: 17 June 2007 04:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Fascinating stuff, Dutchtoo.

I used to do sound engineering for a daily news program produced in English, Dutch and Spanish and I always looked forward to the Dutch sessions for two reasons. The Dutch woman who did the Dutch voice-overs was stunningly beautiful and given my high school German, I could almost always actually understand what she was saying. Dutch has always interested me because it is almost German and almost English and the similarities to both is intriguing. Eliza’s addition of Afrikaans is always interesting too because it adds another flavor to the mix.

One of my cherished memories is an afternoon Heineken, sitting in Rembrandtplein, watching the pretty girls walk by.

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Posted: 17 June 2007 07:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Maybe you should change your name to dirtydog, Happy. ;)

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Posted: 18 June 2007 09:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Oh, or an Amstel on the Leidseplein, Happydog. The girls are a constant of course.

I’m afraid that zielig an silly aren’t related, BlackGrey. I too was lead to believe that for a while, by a not so well informed English teacher. ‘Zielig’ means something like ‘related to the soul’ and ‘ziel’ and ‘soul’ are cognates. In your Van Dale you can see that the origin of the word is obscure. (Etymology on line seems to agree.

Since both ‘zalig’ and ‘ziel’ have a clear religious connotation, the confusion is not so strange.

‘Sul’ however is related to ‘zalig’ and ‘silly’. Again as per Van Dale, in English there was a development in meaning from ‘happy’to ‘ignorant’. (hmm “sillydog” comes to mind for some reason ;) )

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Posted: 23 June 2007 03:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I want to suggest ‘animal’ as a word to mean ‘related to the soul’, but, somehow that is wrong.

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Posted: 23 June 2007 07:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Thews McHeftigan - 23 June 2007 03:54 PM

I want to suggest ‘animal’ as a word to mean ‘related to the soul’, but, somehow that is wrong.

Why so?  AHD4

Middle English, from Latin, from animle, neuter of animlis, living, from anima, soul. See an- in Appendix I.

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Posted: 24 June 2007 06:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I believe you’re missing Thews’ point/joke.  He obviously knows the Latin word means ‘soul’—hence his contemplated suggestion—but the suggested derivative already has a meaning, hence his suggestion is “somehow wrong.”

N.b.: When quoting a dictionary etymology from which long vowels have dropped out, it’s a good idea to add them back in without the macrons.  Animale is a whole lot better than “animle.”

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