/aɪ/ in Canada
Posted: 24 June 2011 04:59 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Wikipedia:IPA for English tells me…

^ Many speakers, for example in most of Canada, have a different vowel in price and ride. Generally, an [aɪ] is used at the ends of words and before voiced sounds, as in ride, file, fine, pie, while an [ʌɪ] is used before voiceless sounds, as in price and write. Because /t/ and /d/ are often conflated in the middle of words in these dialects, derivatives of these words, such as rider and writer, may be distinguished only by their vowel: [ˈɹʷaɪɾəɹ], [ˈɹʷʌɪɾəɹ]. However, even though the value of /aɪ/ is not predictable in some words, such as spider [ˈspʌɪɾəɹ],[citation needed] dictionaries do not generally record it, so it has not been allocated a separate transcription here.

Well there you go, I had not noticed that. Do you hear this, Dave?

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Posted: 24 June 2011 06:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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This may be one of those things you need linguistic training to notice; it’s very hard for untrained speakers of a language to notice distinctions that aren’t phonemic (don’t make a difference in meaning).

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Posted: 24 June 2011 08:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I might have to ‘tube me up some Beachcombers and DeGrassi ...

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Posted: 26 June 2011 08:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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This is true for me, and I think for at least many other northern US speakers. Exceptions (for me) seem to include “spider” and “cider” (but not “sider").

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Posted: 26 June 2011 09:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Isn’t this another vestige of Scottish pronunciation, like the “aboot” which almost invariably identifies a native Canadian?

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Posted: 27 June 2011 12:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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lionello - 26 June 2011 09:46 PM

Isn’t this another vestige of Scottish pronunciation, like the “aboot” which almost invariably identifies a native Canadian?

Plausible. My own pronunciation certainly makes the distinctions in OP’s original post. However, I was in England for my formative years, so my accent is a bit of a mixture and not pure Scots (or pure anything else for that matter).

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Posted: 27 June 2011 03:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Isn’t this another vestige of Scottish pronunciation, like the “aboot” which almost invariably identifies a native Canadian?

Yes, it’s a component of what is known as the Canadian raising of vowel sounds, but there is a question of how much it is related to the Scottish pronunciation. Canadians raise their vowels in a lot more situations than the Scots do.

I haven’t heard this particular one, but of course that means I’ll start hearing it all over now.

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Posted: 27 June 2011 05:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWMNT5fT4K8

In this piece about the White Stripes there are, of course, plenty of examples of /ai/ before unvoiced consonants, and a couple of instances of /ai/ before voiced consonants (surprise, wide) ... I _think_ I can hear it.

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