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Cheesy
Posted: 01 November 2018 12:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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In Spain, one is told to say ’patata‘. I don’t get that one either.

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Posted: 01 November 2018 03:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 01 November 2018 12:57 AM

In Spain, one is told to say ’patata‘. I don’t get that one either.

I suppose every language has its own ‘stretch mouth in grin’ word for the photographers.

In Spanish, they don’t really have long vowels, so instead of the long ‘-ee-’ in the middle of cheese, they repeat their very open but short ‘a’ three times in ‘patata’. The internal t’s don’t change the wide open shape of the mouth.

Be interesting to hear what other languages do say here! Disappointingly, the Dutch are so well versed in English many have taken over the ‘cheese’ word too! I always say ‘say kaas’, as this word (a) means ‘cheese’, and (b) has a nice long open vowel which also serves the purpose.

Can’t remember it in French off hand...?

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Posted: 01 November 2018 06:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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BlackGrey - 01 November 2018 03:43 AM


Can’t remember it in French off hand...?

According to this photographer, it’s “ouistiti”.

http://blog.iamnikon.com/en_GB/coolpix/the-secret-to-a-perfect-photo-smile-not-‘say-cheese’-but…-‘ouistiti’/

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Posted: 01 November 2018 07:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I usually say, “Say ‘tomato juice’”, which is not expected and usually elicits a genuine grin.  :-)

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Posted: 01 November 2018 11:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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The OED (Sep 2016) says:

This sense is probably influenced by the use of the word ‘cheese’ to induce a smile when being photographed

Not sure I buy it either, but “influenced by” is quite different from being derived from.

The full sentence is:

This sense is probably influenced by the use of the word ‘cheese’ to induce a smile when being photographed (see CHEESE n.1 9), as well as by sense 3b. [viz. “Unsubtle; inauthentic; in poor taste; clichéd or excessively sentimental"] There’s no indication that one had a greater influence than the other. But the entry on the phrase ‘Say cheese’ offers, among others, these citations:

1943 Mansfield (Ohio) News-Jrnl. 20 Jan. 9/1 [Ambassador Joseph E. Davies] discovered the formula while having his own picture taken… Just say ‘Cheese’. It’s an automatic smile.
1990 New Age Jrnl. July 18/3 The couples headed for divorce court wore miserable, pasted-on smiles of the ‘say cheese’ variety.
2006 Time Out N.Y. 19 Oct. 115/2 The actors ended by giving thumbs up and wearing ‘say cheese’ smiles.

It’s a very, very short hop from ‘say cheese’ smile to cheesy smile.

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