meet Marx
Posted: 21 June 2007 08:31 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Can anyone help with the etymology of the phrase “to meet Marx”?

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Posted: 21 June 2007 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I was going to ask what it means, but Wordspy provided: ”to meet Marx verb. A euphemism for “to die” that is used exclusively with old Communists.”

Based on that, it seems pretty clear that it refers to the notion that when one dies, there is an afterlife in which one meets people who have already died--in this case, Karl Marx. Cf. “join one’s ancestors” or “go to be with Jesus,” or even Fred Sanford’s “I’m coming, Elizabeth!!” The official atheism of most communist states has obviously not entirely supressed belief in, or at least facetious references to, the afterlife.

edited to insert missing “when”

[ Edited: 21 June 2007 09:18 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 21 June 2007 09:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thank you for the reply. As I understand Wordspy gives this phase as a neologism. Are there any other new phrases for the notion “to die”? Asking this as i’m not a native speaker.

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Posted: 21 June 2007 09:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Victorine - 21 June 2007 09:02 AM

Are there any other new phrases for the notion “to die”? Asking this as i’m not a native speaker.

Welcome!

some of these are quite old:

Cash in your chips
meet your maker
Kicked the bucket
taking a dirt nap
entered the church triumphant
sleeping with the fishes
‘gotta condo mada stona’ (Steve Martin)

This puts me in mind of the Monty Python sketch about the dead parrot.

‘E’s not pinin’! ‘E’s passed on! This parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! ‘E’s expired and gone to meet ‘is maker!

‘E’s a stiff! Bereft of life, ‘e rests in peace! If you hadn’t nailed ‘im to the perch ‘e’d be pushing up the daisies!

‘Is metabolic processes are now ‘istory! ‘E’s off the twig!

‘E’s kicked the bucket, ‘e’s shuffled off ‘is mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the bleedin’ choir invisibile!!

THIS IS AN EX-PARROT!!

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Posted: 21 June 2007 11:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thanks for that posting, Oecolampadius! I’m still laughing as i write!

BTW: I am in no way criticizing your welcoming of Victorine --- posters like her (and like you) deserve to be welcomed every time they show up here to enliven our days --- let me only point out that she’s appeared a number of times on the old site (and been welcomed at least once), and this isn’t her first appearance on this one; and that it might be thought invidious, to welcome repeatedly only one poster, out of the dozens whose appearances are always welcome.

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Posted: 21 June 2007 11:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Victorine - 21 June 2007 09:02 AM

Thank you for the reply. As I understand Wordspy gives this phase as a neologism. Are there any other new phrases for the notion “to die”? Asking this as i’m not a native speaker.

These sorts of expressions are coined easily and often but most never go into widespread use.

I was watching a documentary recently in which a jet fighter pilot said. “You can crank a hard turn, start pulling 7 or 8 Gs, pass out, and the next thing you know, you’re having a bad day.”

I’d say death pretty much qualifies as a bad day.

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Posted: 21 June 2007 12:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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lionello - 21 June 2007 11:41 AM

let me only point out that she’s appeared a number of times on the old site (and been welcomed at least once), and this isn’t her first appearance on this one;

I don’t doubt that’s true and it’s a welcome correction, Lionello.  But I note that she has only 2 posts credited to her, both in this thread.  Something must have happened, since, as you pointed out, I distinctly remember welcoming her before.  And her profile says that she joined in February.  Dunno.

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Posted: 21 June 2007 07:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’d say death pretty much qualifies as a bad day.

Here’s another, from an article about “Fever of Unknown Origin” published on the Internet:

....."The biggest concern in evaluating FUO is identifying patients whose fever has a serious or life-threatening cause in which diagnostic delay could lead to a poor outcome”.....

Roll on poor outcome.

;-)

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Posted: 21 June 2007 09:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Oecolampadius - 21 June 2007 09:59 AM


‘E’s not pinin’! ‘E’s passed on! This parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! ‘E’s expired and gone to meet ‘is maker!

‘E’s a stiff! Bereft of life, ‘e rests in peace! If you hadn’t nailed ‘im to the perch ‘e’d be pushing up the daisies!

‘Is metabolic processes are now ‘istory! ‘E’s off the twig!

‘E’s kicked the bucket, ‘e’s shuffled off ‘is mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the bleedin’ choir invisibile!!

THIS IS AN EX-PARROT!!

It made me think of a similar example - in Twelve Chairs by Ilf and Petrov (i think known in a British translation as Diamonds to Sit On). It would be very interesting to read its English version to see how phrases of the kind had been translated into english

EDIT
found this extract:
“"Claudia Ivanovna’s dead,” his client informed him.
“Well, God rest her soul,” said Bezenchuk.  “So the old lady’s passed
away.  Old ladies pass away . . . or they depart this life. It depends who
she is. Yours, for instance, was small and plump, so she passed away. But if
it’s one who’s a bit bigger and thinner, then they say she has departed this
life. . . .”
“What do you mean ‘they say’? Who says?”
“We say.  The undertakers.  Now you, for instance.  You’re
distinguished-lookin’ and tall, though a bit on the thin side. If you should
die, God forbid, they’ll say you popped off. But a tradesman, who belonged
to the former merchants’ guild, would breathe his last. And if it’s someone
of lower status, say a caretaker, or a peasant, we say he has croaked or
gone west. But when the high-ups die, say a railway conductor or someone in
administration, they say he has kicked the bucket. They say: ‘You know our
boss has kicked the bucket, don’t you?’ “
Shocked by this curious classification of human mortality, Ippolit
Matveyevich asked:
“And what will the undertakers say about you when you die?”
“I’m small fry. They’ll say, ‘Bezenchuk’s gone’, and nothin’ more.”
And then he added grimly:
“It’s not possible for me to pop off or kick the bucket; I’m too small.
But what about the coffin, Mr Vorobyaninov? Do you really want one without
tassels and brocade? “”

[ Edited: 21 June 2007 10:15 PM by Victorine ]
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