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Spun sugar treat - what is it called? 
Posted: 15 July 2007 02:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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"Outjies” in English South African slang simply means “guys”.  Very interesting about the connection with (slightly rude slang) “moera” to a north Dutch dialect.  The polite word for murder in Afrikaans is “vermoor”.

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Posted: 16 July 2007 12:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Does anyone know the Turkish sweet that is sometimes translated as ‘cotton candy’ (i.e. candy floss to me)? It looks a bit the same, but it incorporates some flour and butter, it comes in boxes in little nest shapes, and you can’t eat it without making a mess. I think it comes from one specific town in Turkey.
It’s called <a href=">http://www.flickr.com/photos/augustusgloop/300854399>pishmaniye</a>, which I think means ‘regrets’ (the sh is ş in Turkish)

Not that I have a sweet tooth or anything…

Margaret

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Posted: 16 July 2007 01:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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ElizaD - 15 July 2007 02:11 AM

The polite word for murder in Afrikaans is “vermoor”.

I like the concept of a polite word for murder!

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Posted: 16 July 2007 03:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Does anyone know the Turkish sweet that is sometimes translated as ‘cotton candy’

Actually there is a box of it on my desk! The producer, Hazerbaba, is a good customer of the company I work for.

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Oh, and welcome back!

[ Edited: 16 July 2007 04:19 AM by Dutchtoo ]
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Posted: 16 July 2007 09:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Thank you! I have been back, but I was deleted and I couldn’t be bothered to register again.

Is there a tidy way to eat it?

Margaret

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Posted: 16 July 2007 09:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Wearing something like this…

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Posted: 16 July 2007 09:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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On the subject of sweeties:
What I understand Americans to call candy and Irish and British people to call sweets are called something else by Australians. Lollies.
Is that right, Australian WO-ers?
An Australian lady held out a bag of Jelly Babies to me on a train not so long ago and offered me a lolly. The word she used was familiar to me in a different context so it stumped me a bit to hear her using it for the things she did use it for. But I accepted her kind offer of a Jelly Baby*.

In the UK and Ireland a lolly is short for a lollipop which is only ever some sort of sweet on a stick that children - and often teenage girls and Kojak - suck upon. An ice lolly is a frozen confection, also on a stick. So what do Australians call what I’d call a lolly, then?

*Jelly babies are fruit flavoured jelly sweets/candies/lollies in the shape of ...well… babies, in case anyone needs any clarification on that!

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Posted: 16 July 2007 11:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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Maybe suckers, as they’re called in South Africa?  OTOH, South Africans also enjoy popsicles, not ice suckers.  Though logically, ice suckers should refer to the people who eat popsicles, or maybe to a type of crampon.

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Posted: 16 July 2007 01:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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MoMac - 16 July 2007 09:59 AM

On the subject of sweeties:
What I understand Americans to call candy and Irish and British people to call sweets are called something else by Australians. Lollies.
Is that right, Australian WO-ers?

Over here on the English-speaking side of the Tasman, “sweets” and “lollies” are effectively interchangeable, although you’d probably hear “you wanna lolly?” more often than “you wanna sweet?”

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Posted: 16 July 2007 03:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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And as for the ice lolly/popsicle, that’s an icy pole in Australia (well at least Melbourne) and an ice block in NZ.

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