Ropable (=angry)
Posted: 01 November 2011 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Does this word have any currency outside Australia?

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Posted: 02 November 2011 02:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I don’t recall ever having heard it. The OED lists it as “Austral. and N.Z. slang,” and all the cites appear to be from downunder. But it also gives four different pronunciations, British, U. S., Australian, and N. Z.

Urbandictionary.com has a single entry that says its Australian and gives an Australian example (identifiable as such by the cliches, “Sheila” and “throw a sausage on the barbey,” which probably means it was written by a non-Australian.)

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Posted: 02 November 2011 06:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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But it also gives four different pronunciations, British, U. S., Australian, and N. Z.

I would guess that’s an automatic feature, with no implication about where it’s used.

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Posted: 02 November 2011 07:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I misremembered Mr Burns from the Simpsons using this phrase. Now that I’ve checked, I know what he said was “fit to be tied”.

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Posted: 02 November 2011 08:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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"Fit to be tied” is quite common in the US. To me, FWIW, it indicates anger accompanied by (or due to) exasperation or frustration, not simple unadulterated anger.

Analogous though the term may be, I’ve never heard “ropable” here.

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Posted: 02 November 2011 08:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’ve never heard it or, to my recollection, seen it; this thread represents my first awareness of it.

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Posted: 02 November 2011 08:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Haven’t heard it in the UK, or in South Africa.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 04:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’ve done some research on the word ropable. It seems to be a uniquely Australian word, originating in the nineteenth century, almost certainly in rural areas where stockmen were employed.
The necessity to sometimes tie unbroken horses and/or steers with rope when they became unmanageable was a reality in those days and probably still is today. This practice was very likely extended to employees who, for whatever reason, lost control and became violently angry, and for reasons of safety had to be tied up. Hence the fitting description ‘ropable’ for someone who became so furious they had to be restrained with ropes.

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