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Posted: 17 December 2011 09:57 AM   [ Ignore ]
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In the sense in which Americans use moot (Brits, of course, using the latter to mean open to argument, debatable). Is this sense of academic used in the States or has moot spiked its guns,so to speak? I ask as all the relevant cites seem to be British (an unsound basis for any sort of conclusion but enough to prompt this question.)

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Posted: 17 December 2011 11:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Widely used in the US to mean “of no practical consequence; worth discussing as an academic exercise only”, which is the sense I think you are asking about.

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Posted: 17 December 2011 08:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Seems to reflect a rather poor attitude towards academia…

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Posted: 17 December 2011 09:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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It’s a longstanding tradition to discount the academics. One that I’ve gotten used to and long accepted. I would guess the good Doctor as well. How many angels can dance on the head of a pin? was once a decent academic exercise. How about homoousios versus homo-i-ousios. Not one iota of difference? Possibly.

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