American vs British English in Singapore
Posted: 17 December 2011 09:25 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’ve mentioned before that on English speaking radio in Singapore, some professionals go for something akin to RP (but with the vowels a little bit different from RP). Others go for Standard American. Still others use a kind of hybrid: basically RP but with final rs pronounced, which sounds very peculiar to my ears. e.g. doctor rendered as [doktr] rather than [dɑktr] or [doktə]. Sorry that’s not proper IPA, I’m sure you see what I mean.

Today I heard an radio ad for ANZ bank, and one speaker called it ANzed, and the other called it ANzee.

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Posted: 21 March 2013 03:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Speaking on zeds…

All of the local Singaporeans pronounce pizza as, well, pizza.

ie, /pɪzɑː/

Makes sense but it makes me smile.

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Posted: 29 March 2013 03:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’ve also noticed that printed advertisements in Singapore sometimes use “colour” etc and sometimes “color” etc, sometimes even within the same publication.

I am finding that the usage of and/or in the negative can be, to my mind, irregular here.

Couple of examples:

There is a recorded announcment at the train stations, saying, “Eating or drinking is not allowed on stations and trains.” I would say, “Eating and drinking are not allowed on stations and trains.”

Similarly, there’s a TV spot for a local syrup which says that the product “does not contain preservatives and artificial colours”. I would say “does not contain preservative or artificial colours.”

Then again, maybe I am the weirdo.

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Posted: 29 March 2013 06:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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OP Tipping - 29 March 2013 03:50 AM

I am finding that the usage of and/or in the negative can be, to my mind, irregular here.

Couple of examples:

There is a recorded announcment at the train stations, saying, “Eating or drinking is not allowed on stations and trains.” I would say, “Eating and drinking are not allowed on stations and trains.”

Similarly, there’s a TV spot for a local syrup which says that the product “does not contain preservatives and artificial colours”. I would say “does not contain preservative or artificial colours.”

Then again, maybe I am the weirdo.

sounds like a bad case of conjunctivitis to me.

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Posted: 29 March 2013 08:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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there’s a TV spot for a local syrup which says that the product “does not contain preservatives.......

To my late friend Gilbert (who grew up in Karachi, many years ago), that statement would have meant “this syrup is condom-free”. I don’t know how widespread the term preservative is for a condom: I’ve never heard it from anyone else.

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Posted: 29 March 2013 08:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I don’t know how widespread the term preservative is for a condom: I’ve never heard it from anyone else.

That’s the word Germans use. das Präservativ. But they also use Kondom. And the machine that dispenses same is a Kondomat!

edit: Spanish, French, Polish, Russian as well.

[ Edited: 29 March 2013 08:50 AM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 29 March 2013 09:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thanks, Oeco. Where I grew up, a condom was called condón . I don’t speak any of the other languages you mention.

Query: could a country that enforces birth control be called a kondominion? --- and contrariwise, one that condemns it, a kondominimum ?

;-)

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Posted: 29 March 2013 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Pretty sure the syrup was quandong-free.

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