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Shakespeare as he was spoke
Posted: 26 March 2012 05:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I am ashamed to say I can’t distinguish American and Canadian accents if I meet people or hear them eg Mike Myers and Dan Aykroyd. Same with Kiwi and Oz (sorry OP). Tin ears perhaps unless others do too.

Don’t feel bad - this American usually can’t tell if someone is from one of the northern-tier states or Canada. And many of those snowbirds can’t tell my Texas twang from a Carolina drawl.

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Posted: 26 March 2012 08:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I can distinguish various North American English accents: British Columbians sound pretty different from Ontarians.

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Posted: 26 March 2012 09:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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A giveaway for Anglophone Canadians is their endearing way of saying “aboot” for “about”. It’s hard to miss. I suppose this might be a vestige of the English spoken by the numerous Scots who settled in Canada from the mid-18 century onwards.

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Posted: 26 March 2012 09:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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lionello - 26 March 2012 09:06 AM

A giveaway for Anglophone Canadians is their endearing way of saying “aboot” for “about”. It’s hard to miss. I suppose this might be a vestige of the English spoken by the numerous Scots who settled in Canada from the mid-18 century onwards.

This is also a feature of a Tidewater accent.  Maryland, Eastern Virginia, and Outer Banks of North Carolina.

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Posted: 26 March 2012 09:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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It’s pretty easy to distinguish Kiwis and Australians. Kiwis move all their vowels to the back of the throat, thus apple will come out as epple. American and Canadian are a lot trickier. I’ve heard American comics parodying Canadians on shows like SNL but they mainly seemed to be relying on repeating certain words and phrases rather than accent.

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Posted: 27 March 2012 08:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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There was an exchange in The Flight of the Conchords (HBO) where Kiwi Brett (who co-wrote the script) tells an American fan his name, which went something like:
Brett: Britt.
Fan: You mean like in Britney?
Brett: No, Britt. B-r-e-t-t. Britt.

South African seems even more marked in this regard. Blick for black, etc.

Queen Elizabeth II says en for an. En epple but not like Kiwis would.

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