Origin of word chocolate
Posted: 23 July 2007 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2007-07-23

hi evry1!!
i’m new here. Does anyone here knows the origin of the word “chocolate”. can u also tell the story behind the origin.
thanxx :cheese:

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 July 2007 02:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2777
Joined  2007-01-31

Hi, welcome to the board.

As indicated in the American Heritage Dictionary, “chocolate” comes to English via Spanish, from the Nahuatl (Aztec language) word xocolatl, a combination of the roots for “bitter” and “water”.  Solid chocolate was a European invention; the Aztecs drank it as a beverage, like cocoa but without milk or any sweetening (they did add chili peppers sometimes). This made for quite a bitter drink (hence the name) but supposedly they considered it an aphrodisiac.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2007 10:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2007-02-24

Interesting. I think I heard that somewhere - problably on TV a long time ago. Now, I’m wondering what that taste would be like, especially with the chili peppers. The problem is finding true raw chocolate. I need to do a google search.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2007 10:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2007-02-24

I found it and shall be ordering it in the next couple of days.

http://www.naturalzing.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=21_48

I will let you know what the results are when I put this recipe together.

Edit: I have ordered.

[ Edited: 24 July 2007 10:49 PM by Eyehawk ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 July 2007 10:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

What did it taste like?  I understand that raw chocolate ground up and mixed with boiling water was how chocolate was consumed in England in the 17th century and that chocolate was as widely drunk as coffee was later.  There is a courtyard called Chocolate Court in Hampton Court Palace, where the King’s chocolate was prepared.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 July 2007 09:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2007-02-24

Just got it in today. I bought the liquid, not the solid, due to the fact that the Aztecs used the liquid form (I assumed it would work). I found a recipe, and according to what I could find it included vanilla. I did a quick research, and vanilla did come from Mexico, and was intoduced to the Spaniards by the Aztecs, so it is possible that it could have been an ingredient at that time.

I have to do some more research before I do the test (I only bought 4 ozs.). I want to know exactly what type chili pepper was used. The recipe I found only says “grinding the pepper of chilis”.

The taste (I had to put a drop on my tounge, of course) is more bitter than any unsweetened chocolate I have tasted, but not as bitter as I was expecting.

[ Edited: 30 July 2007 09:22 PM by Eyehawk ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 July 2007 04:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  806
Joined  2007-03-01

There’s an excellent mail-order firm in the UK called Hotel Chocolat (they have shops, too) who sell a 100% dark chocolate bar. It’s astonishing; more like eating espresso coffee that what you expect chocolate to taste like.

http://www.hotelchocolat.co.uk/productmixmatch.asp?pf_id=HCPURISTSLABS

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 July 2007 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2007-02-24

The chili peppers I need are the little red ones. I see that either “chili (from Náhuatl (Aztec) chilli)” or “chile (Spanish)” are both acceptable. Google tried to correct my “chili” spelling. What’s that all about?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 July 2007 02:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  710
Joined  2007-02-07
Eyehawk - 31 July 2007 11:44 AM

Google tried to correct my “chili” spelling. What’s that all about?

Google doesn’t know how to spell, but they’re wizards are remembering what people search for. If there is a popular search keyword close to yours, they’ll offer it up and ask if that is what you meant. It has nothing to do with correct spelling although it often works out that way… or not.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 August 2007 02:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  806
Joined  2007-03-01

Here is a somewhat-adapted 17th-century English recipe for drinking chocolate (the original version would have started by grinding the cocoa beans)

½ kilo of the purest dark chocolate you can get
2 grams ground chill
8 grams ground aniseed
15 grams ground cinnamon
50 ground almond
50 ground hazelnuts
Up to 200 grams sugar, according to your taste and the sweetness of your chocolate.

(If you happen to keep a vanilla pod in a jar of sugar, some of the sugar you use can come from that jar. Not all, though; that would be too much vanilla altogether.)

Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie and add all the other ingredients, mixing well. Pour into bun tins or whatever small moulds you have and leave to cool. Store in a cool place.

To make up your drink, put one or more cakes of chocolate in a warmed coffee pot, pour over boiling water and whisk vigorously till the chocolate is not only fully dissolved but frothy. (The Aztecs considered the froth the best part of chocolate, and poured it back and forth between different vessels from a height to get it frothy; early modern Europeans liked their chocolate frothy also, and 17th and 18th-century European coffee pots had an integral whisk to get it that way.) Serve in small porcelain cups, with a glass of cold water on the side.

Made with chocolate of 80% cocoa content or above, this drink is a real stimulant, even to hardened 21st-century caffeine consumers; it must have been even more strikingly so in the 17th century. The fat from the ground nuts is an alternative to milk, but adds an extra range of flavours as well.

Anybody really interested in chcocolate, its origins and history should check out The True History of Chocolate
by Sophie D. Coe & Michael D. Coe. Cracking good book.

[Link reduced in size to eliminate horizontal scrolling--dw]

[ Edited: 25 August 2007 06:17 AM by Dave Wilton ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 August 2007 08:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

Thanks for that, Syntinen.  Chocolate was obviously a much more complicated drink than coffee.  I had envisaged the drink being prepared like coffee - grind beans, add boiling water - but no.  One day I must try and make some chocolate to that recipe.  Perhaps the intrepid Eyehawk might like to try it out first!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 August 2007 07:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2007-02-24

This is getting frustrating. I can’t find the small chili peppers at the grocery store. I’ll have to go on a mission to some others, but why would they not be in any store? Mexican-Americans shop at the store I go to, but maybe they don’t eat that particular pepper.

More later.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 August 2007 11:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  54
Joined  2007-03-05

The froth is infectious. Indian ‘Pulled Tea’ involves pouring boiling hot tea, milk and sugar between cups to create a head (and to cool the tea to a temperature better suited to srinking).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 August 2007 08:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2007-02-24

OK, I finally worked something out. I soaked a dry red pepper and ground it up, added some vanilla, poured in the raw cocoa juice, and tried it. I think I’ll stick to plain cocoa, but it was not as bad as I thought it would be.

I was surprised by how much just a couple drops of vanilla in a 6-ounce glass stood out. The raw cocoa is not very strong. It is bitter, but not overwhelmingly so. The pepper gave it a bite.

I imagine that it was considered quite good before other, more sweet drinks came along.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 August 2007 02:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

Are you inspired to try Syntinen’s 17th century recipe with the nuts in it?
Is there any mention by Samuel Pepys of his drinking chocolate?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 August 2007 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2007-02-24

I was only trying to get as close as I could to an Aztec recipe. I was simply curious what that first tast of cocoa might be like. I’m sure what I mixed up is not going to taste exactly like what they drank, but even to get close was fun to try.

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ Calypso      The Century Dictionary Online ››