1963 Words
Posted: 31 March 2012 04:13 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Twinks, Daleks, and surfaris.

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Posted: 31 March 2012 06:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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old money, adj. and n. New money dates to at least 1875, but evidently no one thought to coin its antonym until nearly a hundred years later.

From Social Class in America by W. Lloyd Warner, Marchia Meeker, and Kenneth Eells (Harper, 1960), p. 139: “Inherited wealth is frequently referred to as ‘old money’ in contrast to “new money’.” This book was originally published in 1949, and it appears the phrase “old money” occurs in that edition as well, but snippet view is not being helpful and Questia won’t let me see the page although it shows the phrase as occurring on that same page 139 (which suggests that the 1960 reprint is unaltered).  And from Class, Status and Power: A Reader in Social Stratification by Reinhard Bendix (Free Press, 1953), p. 329: “In the social class just below the ‘old money’ families we find most of the ‘high fashion,’ Paris-conscious style leaders whom we have already mentioned.” It seems clear that (as one would expect) the phrase was in use well before 1963.

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