roughhouse
Posted: 02 April 2012 10:03 AM   [ Ignore ]
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have we discussed this before?  Any ideas where this comes from?

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Posted: 02 April 2012 11:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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We discussed it once, but didn’t come up with a lot.

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Posted: 02 April 2012 02:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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BTW, the OED3 says:

The collocation rough house occurs in 19th-cent. British (but not American) newspapers to describe either a private home or an inn where brawling regularly occurred; compare:
1874 Preston Guardian 12 Dec., The defendant had been drinking at the new Inn for three weeks.‥ Mr. Oglethorpe stated that it was a rough house.‥ The prisoner had been convicted frequently for assaults on the police.

Perhaps compare also rough house, denoting an establishment for vagrant children (attested in newspapers and journals from the late 1850s; after German Rauhes Haus, the name of a home for vagrant children in Hamburg, founded in 1833 by the German Lutheran theologian J. H. Wichern (1808–81)).

The 1882 noun use referred to in the earlier thread is in the sense “An uproar, a disturbance, a fight; boisterous behaviour, fighting.” This is labeled “orig. U.S.”

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