1 of 2
1
HD: 1967 Words
Posted: 20 April 2012 03:50 AM   [ Ignore ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4702
Joined  2007-01-03

Be-ins, Naderism, and scratch and sniff

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 April 2012 05:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3472
Joined  2007-01-29

bummer, n.5 The OED’s first citation for bummer, meaning a “bad experience,” is by Joan Didion and appears in the Saturday Evening Post. I’m sure it can be antedated.

Not much of an antedate, but HDAS has it from 1966.

jihadist, n. (and adj.) This one has been around long before 9-11.

And long before 1967!  This is the kind of thing that keeps me doing these book searches; from Homiletic Review, Vol. 69 (1915!), p. 101: “It was laid down that the Jihadist must have the permission of his parents before he could go to war; he must be in good health, and he must have sufficient means to furnish his own weapons and provide for his family.” Page image.

kvell, v. A borrowing from Yiddish, originally from the German quellen, meaning “to gush, well up.” To kvell is “to feel proud, to gloat.”

A slight antedate, to 1965, from Once More from the Beginning by Robert Merrill (p. 139): “There was the family, shining as if they had a special light on them. Poppa was crying, and Momma, flushed and triumphant, was looking around the theater kvelling.”

[Edit: cropped long url--drw]

[ Edited: 26 April 2012 03:19 AM by Dave Wilton ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 03:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4702
Joined  2007-01-03

Thanks.

One favor though. Could you please make it explicit that you’ve seen the whole page and verified that it actually is a page from the issue/date in question?

Being in Canada, I can’t see the full view of many of the pages in Google Books. Even the link to the full page view you posted is truncated to a snippet. And even snippets from book containing the 1965 citation for kvell are not available here.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 05:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3065
Joined  2007-02-26

journo, n. (and adj.) This variation on journalist is originally Australian.

So many of the old Australianisms end in -o.

no worries, int. The iconic Australian saying makes its debut.

It has a wide range of meanings in Australian English.
You’re welcome. “Thanks!” “No worries.”
Apology accepted. “Sorry.” “Yeah, no worries.”
That won’t be a problem. “Do you think you can finish by lunchtime?” “No worries.”
Usually it stands alone but it can be used in a sentence, meaning ‘easily’. “We’ll be out of here by twelve no worries.”

faction, n.2 While people have been writing blends of fact and fiction since the Sumerians first pressed triangular sticks into clay, this name for the genre only dates to the late-1960s.

Never heard of that. Did it die out? Seems an awful choice, given that faction was already a word.

be-in, n. Perhaps nothing is so quintessentially sixties as the be-in. The OED’s definition of “a public gathering of hippies” is accurate, but somehow misses the larger point.

What was the larger point?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 05:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4702
Joined  2007-01-03

This use of faction may have died out. At least I haven’t heard it in a long while. Alex Haley was fond of describing Roots as “faction.” He was probably the biggest proponent of the word. I’d like to say it’s lack of long-term success as a word is probably due to faction having another, long-established meaning, but that’s not true in so many other cases.

The larger point of be-in is that it represents an entire philosophical and spiritual outlook that is iconic and stereotypical of the era.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 07:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  811
Joined  2007-06-20
Dave Wilton - 21 April 2012 03:18 AM

Being in Canada, I can’t see the full view of many of the pages in Google Books.

Get yerself a VPN ($60 a year or so). The research I do would be impossible without the ability to pretend to Google that I’m in Seattle, or New York, or even Austin, Texas, rather than London, Abu Dhabi or Hong Kong ... and I get to watch BBC iPlayer without being in the UK as well.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3472
Joined  2007-01-29

Could you please make it explicit that you’ve seen the whole page and verified that it actually is a page from the issue/date in question?

Yes, specifically from the February 1915 issue.  It’s from “The Holy War,” by Richard Gottheil, which is also in the Feb. 6, 1915 issue of The Advocate: America’s Jewish Journal, Vol. 48, p. 830:
books?id=0xYcAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA830&img=1&zoom=3&hl=en&sig=ACfU3U0y3OlOGOd0KkPANki8nrrmr_7BBg&ci=390,1018,285,115&edge=0

(Hotlink provided for those who can see it; here’s a page image.)

[Edit: cropped long url --dw]

[ Edited: 26 April 2012 03:21 AM by Dave Wilton ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 10:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  710
Joined  2007-02-07

The OED’s definition of “a public gathering of hippies” is accurate, but somehow misses the larger point.

Not even accurate in my opinion.

If a “be in” was “a public gathering of hippies” then every day of 1968 in the Haight was a “be in.” Be ins were a deliberate celebration of the counterculture lifestyle. Things were very different then. I was threatened with expulsion from a public high school because my hair touched the collar of my shirt. It seems hard to imagine these days that having long hair automatically made you some sort of dangerous rebel. Celebrating the free-wheeling hippie lifestyle really was a political statement for a lot of people in those days, not simply “a public gathering.”

[ Edited: 21 April 2012 11:01 AM by happydog ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 12:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3472
Joined  2007-01-29

I agree with happydog; “a public gathering of hippies” is a terrible definition.  Wikipedia has a pretty good article on the originating event, the Human Be-In (get it?).

Things were very different then.

Indeed.  I still shake my head remembering how the girls had their skirts measured with a ruler and got sent home if they weren’t the prescribed length (this would have been circa 1966-67, my junior year of high school).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 April 2012 01:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4702
Joined  2007-01-03

Get yerself a VPN ($60 a year or so).

I’ve been tempted, but I think it would screw up, or seriously slow, my proxy connection with the university.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 April 2012 01:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  811
Joined  2007-06-20
languagehat - 21 April 2012 12:00 PM

Things were very different then.

Indeed.  I still shake my head remembering how the girls had their skirts measured with a ruler and got sent home if they weren’t the prescribed length (this would have been circa 1966-67, my junior year of high school).

Ha! At my daughter’s school (for girls aged 10-16) skirts are STILL measured by teachers with a ruler, girls still roll their skirts up under their jumpers once outside the school gates, and parents still get sent letters by the head teacher reminding them of regulations on skirt length.

Don’t think hair length is an issue with boys any more, but I remember in 1970, my last year of school before university, when skinhead* culture was becoming more widely known in the UK, it was suddenly the minority with too short hair that was the attention of the authorities’ wrath. It is, of course, not the actual form taken by the physical expression of difference that attracts the attention of those in authority and those under them, but the perceived rebellion against authoritarian rule implicit in that expression of difference.

* in the British sense of “person, typically a young man, belonging to any of various subcultures identified by having the hair very closely cropped or shaved off entirely”, first found in 1969, the OED says.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 April 2012 09:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3472
Joined  2007-01-29

At my daughter’s school (for girls aged 10-16) skirts are STILL measured by teachers with a ruler

Good lord.  Do they have to give speeches in Latin as well?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 April 2012 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1991
Joined  2007-02-19

It is interesting to note that throughout much of European history, from earliest antiquity, men have worn their hair long. The periods when short cropped hair (for leading men, at any rate) was the rule have been mostly brief, and characterized by military dictatorship. Consider the Roman period of the Tetrarchy (late 3rd. early 4th cent. C.E.), the Commonwealth in Britain, and the Nazi regime in Germany. (I’m not counting the time when wigs were worn. That was an anomaly which lasted less than 200 years).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 April 2012 02:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4702
Joined  2007-01-03

I’m not sure you can say that twentieth century Western Europe was “characterized by military dictatorship.” Yes there were the Nazis, a whole twelve years in one country (or twenty years and two countries if you count Italy). But generally the twentieth century is one when liberal democracy flourished and men’s hair was worn relatively short.

And if you count just about any period before WWII or any other place besides North America, authoritarian regimes have been the norm regardless of the popularity of certain hair styles.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 April 2012 12:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1991
Joined  2007-02-19

You’re right, Dave. I ought to have said cropped hair, really. I do think that cropped hair is a much more usual choice for bully-boys than long hair, even if it’s not an invariable rule.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 April 2012 02:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1265
Joined  2007-03-21

Is it just my browser (Chrome) or did lh’s hotlink cause everyone’s pages to be half-again wider than the computer screen. And I have a laptop with a wide screen).

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
 
‹‹ Mechanic as surname, etc      HD: 1968 Words ››