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Character’s names in fiction/film
Posted: 27 February 2007 07:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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The book version

As opposed to?

The character doesn’t seem to have appeared in the movie, even if one for some reason wanted to consider the movie canonical in preference to the book.  And the sch- version is the standard German spelling (of scheiss; the compound apparently doesn’t actually occur in German.) “Sheisskopf” is a typo or misspelling, AFAICT.

Note: This and other apparently inexplicable comments by myself and others in this thread are responses to posts by jimgorman, which disappeared when his account was cancelled.

[ Edited: 25 March 2007 03:28 PM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 01 March 2007 12:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Sheisskopf” is a typo or misspelling, AFAICT.

- Or a Yiddish spelling? Yiddish words of German origin are routinely spelt with sh- rather than sch-, e.g. shtum, shmuck.

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Posted: 01 March 2007 09:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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But kurwamac was specifically referring to Heller’s use of the word as a name for a character in Catch-22.  In the book, it’s spelled Scheisskopf.  Kurwy’s “Sheisskopf” is thus a typo or a misspelling--not one worth making a big deal of, but it seems we can’t just let it be.

[ Edited: 01 March 2007 10:28 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 01 March 2007 08:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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OK, I’ll take that as a compliment and I hope and trust kurwy will do the same.

[ Edited: 01 March 2007 09:02 PM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 01 March 2007 10:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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BTW, on double-checking the name in the book, I find that I misremembered Scheisskopf’s rank.  He’s an officer, a lieutenant at the beginning of the book but by the end he’s made general.

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Posted: 02 March 2007 04:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I think I’m going to kill myself.

Yesterday I forgot the PIN for my debit card. I’ve been using it for the past couple of years, and the last time was only a few days ago. I still can’t remember it. This is the beginning of the end.

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Posted: 02 March 2007 08:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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kurwamac - 02 March 2007 04:43 AM


Yesterday I forgot the PIN for my debit card.

Would you have said “PIN number” if I hadn’t been making a fuss about it on another thread, or did you think PIN number and write PIN? (which is what I do most of the time - it is the beginning of the end)

PINs are a pest.

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Posted: 02 March 2007 08:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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If I’d said ‘PIN number’, I really would have to top myself.

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Posted: 02 March 2007 08:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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I say “PIN number,” as does almost everybody.  It’s a standard English phrase.  Etymology is not destiny.  (Do you also avoid saying “the Alhambra” because al- means ‘the’?)

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Posted: 02 March 2007 09:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Yesterday I forgot the PIN for my debit card.

Happens to me all the…

What were we talking about?

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Posted: 02 March 2007 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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I haven’t had occasion to say anything about (the) Alhambra, but I imagine I would use the article, because ‘Alhambra’ means ‘the red one’, so in its transferred sense of a theatre, say, I’d consider that it had lost its original meaning and was an English word. For the original, I’d consider not using it (though I might chicken out).

I don’t use the article with ‘hoi polloi’, though. In fact, it seems to me that its use or non-use is a fitting shibboleth to determine who belongs to it.

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Posted: 02 March 2007 09:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Assuming that those who do, do, count me among the rabble (along with Dryden and Byron, according to the OED).

[ Edited: 02 March 2007 09:21 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 02 March 2007 09:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Count me with the rabble too.

And the OED. In English use normally preceded by the definite article even though hoi means ‘the’.

First cite: 1668 DRYDEN Dram. Poesie 65 If by the people you understand the multitude, the hoi polloi (Greek characters replaced by English)

Pipped by Doc’s edit.

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Posted: 02 March 2007 09:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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along with Dryden and Byron

and ElizaD, who says things like “the hoi polloi”, “PIN number” and “blonde-haired woman” that obviously categorise her as terminally ignorant.  But do I get any points for street cred?

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Posted: 02 March 2007 10:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Aren’t we all hoi polloi unless we have an aristocratic title?  What does the OED say?

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