Fuck me! 
Posted: 29 May 2012 10:29 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Does anyone know when this expression of surprise, anger, disdain and disappointment first entered the language? My American friend is certain that it was coined over there, whereas to my British ears it has a homegrown feel.

And yes, once again I’m relying on you guys to look smart on the internet!

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Posted: 29 May 2012 11:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The first citation in the OED is from Frederic Manning, who was born in Australia but spent his adult life in the UK (except when fighting in WW I). The actual quote is “1929 F. Manning Middle Parts of Fortune II. xi. 229 ‘Well, you can fuck me!’ exclaimed the astonished Martlow.” But the next citation, which is the compact phrase, is from an American ("1943 G. Biddle Jrnl. 31 July in Artist at War (1944) 77 Teddy’s run of literary allusions is a pleasant relief after the too concentrated diet of ‘fuck me’s’ and ‘fuck you’s’ of the G.I.’s.") and most of the rest appear to me American also, though I haven’t checked them all.

So, if you want to claim that the Manning citation counts, the first example is arguably British.

BTW, I’ve found the full text on Project Guteberg Australia, and the context is indeed one of astonishment and not defiant anger: the character, a soldier, makes the exclamation when he finds a bottle of scotch hidden inside a loaf of bread in a parcel of food sent to one of his comrades.

[ Edited: 29 May 2012 11:32 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 29 May 2012 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Sheidlower’s The F Word has the same Manning citation as the first cite. So the OED is pretty much up to date on this one.

Origin aside, to this American’s ears there is nothing particularly British about the expression. It’s a standard idiom in American speech too.

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Posted: 29 May 2012 11:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks Dr Techie!

Not quite as clear cut as I’d hoped but the Manning quote does seem like a contender - the context, i.e. astonishment, is right. I can’t say the same for the other quote, if anything the pairing with ‘fuck you’ is just confusing.

Thinking about this some more, isn’t the phrase in question just a cruder version of blow me (down)?

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Posted: 29 May 2012 01:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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It’s a standard idiom in American speech too.

It always reminds me of the scene in the movie Speed.  For the unfamiliar, a city bus has had a bomb planted on its underside that will go off if its speed drops below 50 mph (80 km/h), unless the city pays a ransom to the person who set it).  A cop, played by Keanu Reeves, has removed an access panel from the floor and is examining the underside of the moving bus; a passenger has been relaying conversation between him and headquarters, since the cop can’t hold onto cell phone while he’s got his head under the bus.  So the passenger has been repeating everything the cop says into the phone, and repeating back to the cop everything the contact at headquarters says.

Suddenly, Keanu Reeves sees a big bundle of C4 on the underside of the bus and exclaims “Fuck me!”
The passenger, after a moment’s hesitation, says into the phone, “Oh, darn.”

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Posted: 29 May 2012 01:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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does this look kosher for ‘blow me’?

http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/20/messages/619.html

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Posted: 29 May 2012 02:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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The OED lists “blow me” among “III. Senses of doubtful position” (i.e., expressions where the precise sense of blow is not clear). First citation (1789) is blow me up; the next two (early 19th cent.) are blow me tight; the unadorned blow me is first cited in 1827.  It pretty clearly isn’t meant as “fellate me”, as modern ears might interpret it, but the sense of blow on which it is based is not entirely clear.

("Blow me down” as an expression is not covered in the OED, and occurs only once, incidentally, in a 1959 citation of “old boy”.)

[ Edited: 29 May 2012 02:26 PM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 29 May 2012 02:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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"Blow the Man Down”, on the other hand, is a sea chantey, apparently from the early or middle 19th century.  Note, I am not saying that the phrase has a nautical origin.

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Posted: 29 May 2012 05:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Dr. Techie - 29 May 2012 01:03 PM

It always reminds me of the scene in the movie Speed

For me it’s Vincent Vega in Pulp Fiction repeatedly exclaiming the phrase after Mia OD’s.  I guess it was a big phrase in 1994.

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Posted: 30 May 2012 12:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Doesn’t surprise me that the early-use is attributed to an Australian, it is a very common expression here. Fuck me dead is also common, as is my personal choice, fuck me ragged.

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Posted: 30 May 2012 05:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Persons who spent most of there life in rural and small town Nevada may say “Fuck me running!” as an expression of surprise. Sometimes it is “Well. Fuck me running!”.

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Posted: 30 May 2012 05:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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There are lots of variants. I was going to say that Stephen Fry said or wrote somewhere: ‘Fuck me sideways and call me Mabel,’ but on reflection I think it was ‘bugger me’. Although searching on the phrase turns up one hit for the ‘fuck’ version, but none for the ‘bugger’ one. ‘Fuck me sideways’ is much more common than ‘bugger me sideways’, if the internet reflects wider usage. Though I think the latter has a better rhythm.

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Posted: 30 May 2012 11:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Yes, it has a similar meter to “beggar thy neighbour”.

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Posted: 31 May 2012 01:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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"Fuck me sideways” brings to mind the prostitute who had a hole made in her hip, so she could earn a little money on the side.
“Bugger me sideways” would call for much more extensive surgery, and might lead to post-operative digestive complications.

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Posted: 31 May 2012 02:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Not as bad as “fuck me with a chain saw”, a favorite expression of a woman friend of mine.

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Posted: 31 May 2012 05:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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“Fuck me sideways” brings to mind the prostitute who had a hole made in her hip, so she could earn a little money on the side.

ROFL

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