casu quo
Posted: 04 June 2012 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Just encountered this phrase: never seen it before.

Having looked it up, it seems to mean “in which case”.

Is it common enough in English to be considered to be _part_ of English (like et cetera or mutatis mutandi) or is this a case of someone using a phrase from Latin and hoping the audience knows Latin?
Or something else…

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Posted: 04 June 2012 07:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Verberat me.

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Posted: 04 June 2012 08:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Me quoque.

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Posted: 04 June 2012 10:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think casu quo is far from being a common phrase in English - compared with “et cetera”, which millions of people use (not only in English) without ever knowing it’s Latin.  Checking casu quo on Google, the most frequent occurrences seem to be in Dutch.

is this a case of someone using a phrase from Latin and hoping the audience knows Latin?

Seems to me that the opposite is much more probable: that the person using it hopes that his audience doesn’t know Latin, and will thus be put at a disadvantage. “One-upmanship” is so important to so many people.

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Posted: 05 June 2012 01:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I think casu quo is far from being a common phrase in English

Glad to hear that, hate to think I’d been out of the loop all this time.

Perhaps the person is Dutch.

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Posted: 05 June 2012 02:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I thought perhaps it might be used in legal contexts, but it’s not listed in Black’s Law Dictionary, so evidently not.

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Posted: 05 June 2012 07:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Not in the OED, not in a dictionary of foreign words and phrases.

Where did you encounter it?

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Posted: 05 June 2012 11:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Different languages adopted different expressions from Latin, which shouldn’t be surprising when you think about it but nevertheless these are often unexpected.  I recall that Senning once tossed out a Latin phrase that is apparently common in Danish but not in English: ad notam.

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Posted: 05 June 2012 04:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I asked him: he’s Dutch.

So there you go.

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Posted: 07 June 2012 09:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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staat gewoon in het woordenboek
c.q. = casu quo = as the case may be; and/or

I suspect it’s found in Roman-Dutch law.  It used to be the name of a South African magazine, Die Veldmuis.

Dutchtoo!

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/dutch_to_english/computers:_software/973274-cq.html

[ Edited: 07 June 2012 09:41 PM by ElizaD ]
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