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humble again
Posted: 07 June 2012 04:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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I don’t see any way of explaining the point more clearly than happydog and Faldage have, so I won’t attempt to, but I’m with them.

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Posted: 07 June 2012 05:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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I’m struggling to understand, though, why posts in a forum which has always supported evolution of word meaning through common usage are now saying that someone else’s words should mean what they, not the speaker, think it should mean.

That’s very well, but what _does_ the Queen mean? That’s what I’m trying to ascertain.
_Has_ the meaning of humbling changed so that it means elevating, buoying, some other meaning that would suit this context? If so, huzzah! I hope the dictionaries are updated soon.
Or is the Queen uttering a common white lie? I can’t read her mind, and in any case this is not just about this one instance: this is a continuation of a yuku thread in which plenty of other examples are given.

She got it by simple virtue of being the eldest daughter of a man who was king, a king with no male heirs.  Whether she did anything that required great effort on her part I wouldn’t know, not being aware of any of the finer workings of the United Kingdom, but even if she had I could easily see that she might not think they were anything more than what any reasonably competent person would have done in her circumstances.

Whether or not the Queen is deserving of her post or the adulation she is receiving would be a political matter somewhat beyond the scope of this forum, I would think.

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Posted: 07 June 2012 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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And yes, nice to see you back, Eliza. :-)

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Posted: 07 June 2012 09:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Receiving the cheers of tens of thousands is in no way a humbling experience.

No, it isn’t if you think it’s yours as of right.  But if you’re a very religious person (as the Queen is), cheers and adulation after a lifetime of privilege might make you at least reflect on your own small place in the natural order of things as opposed to the divine right of kings of old to be greeted with cheers and adulation.  It was a very touching remark.

If you’re determined not to see this, then I can’t explain it any better to you.

(And thank you all for your welcome).

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Posted: 16 March 2013 11:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Thanks to Doonesbury, I have learnt a word relevant to this thread:

humblebrags

What a useful term! Some days, Facebook is filled to overflowing with humblebrags.

The second entry on urbandictionary covers it well:

2.  humblebrag 125 up, 37 down

The lowest, most despicable and loathsome form of self promotion, often delivered in a terse one or two fragmented sentences on social networking sites. A typical and popular approach is to use a disingenuous complaint about something, a self-deprecating statement or a comment on something completely innocuous, as a vehicle to deliver the real message, which invariably shows the person in a favourable light. In fact it shows what an attention seeking and insecure person they really are.

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Posted: 17 March 2013 02:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Uriah Heep clearly has a multitude of descendants.

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Posted: 17 March 2013 03:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Not that I particularly wish Richard to come back, but if he read this thread (or, Lord knows, any of a great many others) it might correct his misapprehension that we’re a bunch of sycophants who always agree with Dave.

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Posted: 06 May 2016 02:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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Frabjous day, I have finally encountered an example of the phrase ‘humbling experience’ that makes some kind of sense, as whizkid Harry Enten lays out the lessons he learned this year from his poor predictions of the Republican Primary.
http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-four-things-i-learned-from-the-donald-trump-primary/

Whatever happens with Trump in the general election, it was a humbling experience for the guy writing these words to you now. The lesson I take from it is you shouldn’t dismiss polling data, even when it doesn’t line up with your priors.

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Posted: 09 May 2016 07:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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I agree with Happy Dog and ElizaD.  The Queen’s response is lovely—and entirely understandable.  When someone (in this case an entire nation) goes out of their way to offer appreciation, it is, or should be, a humbling experience.  It has nothing to do with the Queen’s deserving or not deserving recognition.  She is just acknowledging that the appreciation is not entirely about her personality or her accomplishments—she is a holder of a title that is much greater than the individual who temporarily occupies the office.  The good will of the nation inspires humility.

The fact that she would express herself this way shows that she is a great Queen and, I am sure, makes her people love her more.

I have to say that, while I am a big fan of democracy, I wish some of our current political candidates in the U.S. would show even a little bit of this humility.

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Posted: 09 May 2016 08:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Whatever happens with Trump in the general election, it was a humbling experience for the guy writing these words to you now. The lesson I take from it is you shouldn’t dismiss polling data, even when it doesn’t line up with your priors

It seems to me that in this case, a more appropriate word would have been “humiliating”. This guy is nursing injured amour propre, even if he’s pretending not to. Queen Elizabeth isn’t.

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Posted: 09 May 2016 12:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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lionello - 09 May 2016 08:50 AM

Whatever happens with Trump in the general election, it was a humbling experience for the guy writing these words to you now. The lesson I take from it is you shouldn’t dismiss polling data, even when it doesn’t line up with your priors

It seems to me that in this case, a more appropriate word would have been “humiliating”. This guy is nursing injured amour propre, even if he’s pretending not to. Queen Elizabeth isn’t.

It may or may not have been humiliating: that’s a separate issue.

But it has clearly been a humbling experience for him. Humbling is an entirely appropriate word here per the primary definition: the experience has “rendered (Enten) humble or meek in spirit”, it has"caused (Enten) to think more lowly of himself.”

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Posted: 09 May 2016 01:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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I have a question for those who think that the Queen shouldn’t have used the word “humbling” in that context. If she meant that it had made her reflect on the good fortune she had to have been born into privilege, what should she have said?

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Posted: 09 May 2016 01:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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She could have said she felt grateful. Blessed. Honoured.

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Posted: 09 May 2016 01:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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All of which sound more likely to represent what a republican thinks she ought to have been saying.

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Posted: 09 May 2016 04:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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All of which sound more likely to represent what a republican thinks she ought to have been saying.

Eliza, I didn’t want to mention my views on the monarchy since they are irrelevant to this discussion on words, but it seems your fascination with them is preventing your brain from working normally and analysing input neutrally, so I’ll just clear up that problem by stating that I think that the UK would be insane to become a republic.

I DIDN’T say that she ought to be saying she feels grateful, blessed, honoured. I was answering YOUR question: “If she meant that it had made her reflect on the good fortune she had to have been born into privilege, what should she have said?” Those three words fairly closely represent that sentiment.

Humbled doesn’t reflect the sentiment you have specified. Someone who is reflecting on their good fortune to be born into privilege is not “low in spirit” because of it, she is not “feeling a sense of deflation”, she is not “made meek of spirit” or “thinking lowly of herself”, or any of the other meanings of humbled.

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