HD: 1983 Words
Posted: 13 June 2012 03:40 AM   [ Ignore ]
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DNR, liposuction, and spell-check

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Posted: 13 June 2012 06:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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MUD, n.3 This acronym was originally the name of a specific computer game, Multi-User Dungeon. But since MUD’s appearance in 1983, the term has become more general and is applied to a class of computer games, and reanalyzed as multi-user domain/dimension.

I understood this to be “MUDD” multi-user dungeons and dragons

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Posted: 13 June 2012 06:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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DNR, n. and adj. The OED officially gives a 1983 use of the medical initialism, standing for do not resuscitate, as the first citation, but it includes a 1976 citation of DNR from the New York Times in brackets, although it’s not at all clear why brackets appear in the entry, which are generally used for foreign uses, prototypical forms, and uses not quite in the current sense.

My guess is that it’s because that first occurrence is a citation of a code used in hospital records rather than an actual use of the term.

I understood this to be “MUDD” multi-user dungeons and dragons

Not only have I never heard or seen this, but it doesn’t make any sense, because it’s the dungeon that is multi-user—the dragons are part of the name of the game, but not of this expression.

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Posted: 13 June 2012 06:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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languagehat - 13 June 2012 06:37 AM


I understood this to be “MUDD” multi-user dungeons and dragons


Not only have I never heard or seen this, but it doesn’t make any sense, because it’s the dungeon that is multi-user—the dragons are part of the name of the game, but not of this expression.

It was a misconception. And a long-held one at that. Wikipedia offers more information.

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Posted: 13 June 2012 10:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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It’s interesting that cellphone didn’t take off in the UK. The 1985 and 1991 cites in the OED are British so it was clearly in use early on but mobile phone shortened to mobile eventually won out here.

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Posted: 13 June 2012 07:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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All she wants to do is ride around, Sally: Ride, Sally Ride.

Mobile phone is what took off in Australia ... obviously I’m biased but mobile phone always seems a better term than cellular phone, to me, since it is the mobility that is what’s distinctive, right?
Nah, probably it’s no better, it’s just what I’m used to.

When did beat-box (v) arise?

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Posted: 14 June 2012 01:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I had a “cell phone” around ‘87.  At the time “cell” was used to differentiate the technoloy from existing mobile or radio phones.
It does seem to have worn off through the 90’s, but stil hangs around.  However now even “mobile” is getting dropped; most I hear is “where’s my phone”. The fixed-line phone being called the house or home phone.

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Posted: 14 June 2012 01:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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One also hears “handphone” a bit.

I had a “cell phone” around ‘87.

YUPPIE! ;-)

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Posted: 14 June 2012 08:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Yes, we always refer to our home phone as the landline.

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