HD: 1984 Words
Posted: 14 June 2012 03:17 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Freakazoids, netizens, and yuppies

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Posted: 14 June 2012 03:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Ha. I just called steve one of those things.

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Posted: 14 June 2012 06:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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There was a competing acronym, “yumpie”, at the same time.  That was for Young Upwardly Mobile Professionals.

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Posted: 14 June 2012 06:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hymie, n. By 1984, the familiar form of the Jewish personal name Hyman is being used as a derogatory term for Jews in general.

HDAS cites it from 1973.

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Posted: 14 June 2012 08:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Just curious, was “Hymie” a black thing, like “Gober” in Bonfire of the Vanities?  Or was it a Chicago thing?  I confess that in my Metro-NYC life I hadn’t heard it before Jesse Jackson got himself in all that hot water in 1984 with “Hymie” for Jews and “Hymietown” for New York City.  I remember thinking of Hymie the Robot from the 1960’s comedy Get Smart, and thinking the character’s name must have been an inside joke.

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Posted: 14 June 2012 09:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I don’t think Hymie is specifically African American, nor is it particularly regional.

I too considered Get Smart when I was writing up the entry. I concluded that since the derogatory use didn’t appear for another fifteen years Brooks was just making a joke about a Jewish robot, and that Hymie the Robot was hypocoristic rather than derogatory. But given the 1973 cite in HDAS, it may be that Brooks was doing a bit of reclaiming of the name which was edging into derogatory use.

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