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“Bespoke” (adj.) in US
Posted: 23 June 2012 10:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Yes, I realized that but I still don’t get it.

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Posted: 23 June 2012 10:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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ElizaD - 23 June 2012 10:04 AM

Yes, I realized that but I still don’t get it.

A lilting tone of voice and ironic smile is missing from the post. Perhaps a wink.

Anyway, the links in that old post I linked to are corrupted. The original thread where the word was created (and Dave spewed coffee on his screen) is here. It begins with Podkayne asking:

I’ve experienced that many times--nevahoiduvvit, then suddenly it’s everywhere I look. Could be a word, a phrase, a concept. I feel like that character in Catch 22 spotting Yossarian up a tree, naked: it’s not deja vu, because I haven’t seen it before; not jamais vu (never seen, Eliza), because I do see it now; nor presque vu (almost seen) because I definitely did see it...so maybe the French don’t have a word, but is there one in English?

A psychologist might say that it is simply a heightened awareness, but dang it, I want a specific word.

It started in another thread with me saying that I had never heard of the word “fibonnaci” before and then read it twice in one day. Pod asks if there is a word for that. I was just repeating that scenario in my failed note. TMI?

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Posted: 23 June 2012 12:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Guess the joke was too feeble even for my feeble mind....

;-)

Ed. (and it didn’t soar. It put-putted faintly)

[ Edited: 23 June 2012 12:50 PM by lionello ]
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Posted: 25 June 2012 06:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Coming back to the original subject: here in Rightpondia bespoke has acquired a wider metaphorical usage, akin to tailor-made. Travel companies offer ‘bespoke holidays’ as opposed to off-the-shelf package deals, for example.

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Posted: 25 June 2012 08:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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One gathers from a quick look through US tailoring sites that custom tailors is the equivalent American term.

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Posted: 25 June 2012 09:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Oecolampadius, I owe you an apology. In the course of our contacts in this forum, I had developed an image of you - as a candid sort of person, straightforward, even somewhat ingenuous, wholly free of wile and guile. It did not occur to me that you might be an individual of subtle, yea Machiavellian, wit. Thus was I misled into taking literally, your remarks about serendipity. How wrong can a person be?  I regret my ill-natured crack about your jest “only put-putting” --- truly, as languagehat pointed out, the wit zoomed high over my head. From now on, I shall put on my analytical spectacles, and read between the lines of your every post, searching for the subtle innuendo*, the sly double entendre...... and meanwhile, I ask your pardon, for having so devastatingly underestimating you. 

* (My brother-in-law Sam says, by the way, that “innuendo” means “an Italian suppository")

;-)

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Posted: 26 June 2012 02:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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(My brother-in-law Sam says, by the way, that “innuendo” means “an Italian suppository")

;-)

Love it! And will use it.

Not to worry Lionello. And thanks!

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Posted: 26 June 2012 09:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Only use it in a medical emergency, Oeco—suppositories can be strong medicine

;-)

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Posted: 17 July 2012 01:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Only use it in a medical emergency, Oeco—suppositories can be strong medicine

;-)
----

Putting the anal back into analgesia.

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Posted: 17 July 2012 01:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Was that “Sorry for not being clearer about the joke” or “Sorry, I forgot about diegogarcity”?  Because if it’s the latter, I join OP in his ROFL.

I was ROFLing because I assumed the former to be the case.

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Posted: 06 December 2015 02:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Dave Wilton - 19 June 2012 10:29 AM

I’ve seen the phrase “bespoke suit” a fair number of times. I don’t recall hearing “bespoke” in other contexts.

Slate article on breastfeeding

One of the worst moments of my first year with my first child was a visit from a well-regarded lactation consultant. She told me that both my son’s sucking skills and my milk production were B-grade; to improve, she instructed me to pump after every feeding and to guzzle an awful bespoke herbal tea.

Thanks to this thread, I get it, but it seems altogether odd. And without this thread, I would have no idea what was being said.

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Posted: 07 December 2015 07:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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“To bespeak” is a perfectly ordinary English word, one of whose meanings is “to order in advance” (“these seats are bespoken”). Most of us may not use it very often, but that doesn’t mean it’s no longer there. There are hundreds of thousands of perfectly ordinary English words which most of us don’t say very often, if at all:  eleemosynary, inchoate. The fact that lots of us don’t use them, in no way invalidates them; when we do use them, we may get them wrong, and (if the misuse is frequent enough) eventually endow them with quite another meaning (cf. nonplussed, awful…. and turgid, which I’ve more than once heard used to mean “turbid”).  “Spoke” was at one time interchangeable with “spoken” (see Malcolm, in Macbeth, Act I, Scene iv: “….I have spoke with one that”….), and likewise, “bespoke” is an archaism which once meant the same as “bespoken”. I know of at least one other case, connected with dress, in which an archaic form survives in one very specific usage: some people (not I!) speak of a “riding habit”, but wouldn’t dream of referring to a set of, say, baseball clothes as a “baseball habit”. I’m sure there are other examples of such archaic survivals.

Note re earlier thread: it’s Fibonacci, Oeco, not Fibonnaci(smacks lips over fat, juicy nit which almost got away)

ALARM!!! In my browser, “diegogarcity” only gets 710 hits today! Humanity is obviously racing headlong toward an abyss (n.b. not a female abbot) of total illiteracy............

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Posted: 07 December 2015 07:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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I notice that the UD entry for diegogarcity is written by garlicrabbit in 2010. I wonder who that is.

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Posted: 07 December 2015 07:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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“To bespeak” is a perfectly ordinary English word, one of whose meanings is “to order in advance” (“these seats are bespoken”).

I have never in my life seen or heard it used in that sense.

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Posted: 07 December 2015 10:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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There are hundreds of thousands of perfectly ordinary English words which most of us don’t say very often, if at all:  eleemosynary, inchoate. The fact that lots of us don’t use them, in no way invalidates them…

This is true, however, I would not classify eleemosynary and inchoate as necessarily obsolete or infrequently used words. I occasionally encounter these words in my reading. I do agree, regrettably, that these kinds of words are slowly atrophying in our English dictionaries.

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