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cut = drunk
Posted: 01 July 2012 11:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I’ve always liked this remark from Helene Hanff (in 84 Charing Cross Road):

I was talked out of learning Early Anglo-Saxon / Middle English by a friend who had to take it for her Ph.D. They told her to write an essay in Early Anglo-Saxon on any-subject-of-her-own-choosing. “Which is all very well,” she said bitterly, “but the only essay subject you can find enough Early Anglo-Saxon words for is ‘How to Slaughter a Thousand Men in a Mead Hall’.”

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Posted: 02 July 2012 01:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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lionello - 30 June 2012 03:38 AM

English speakers who use Yiddish slang terms would add shicker or shikker - from Hebrew shikor, drunk. I think this term is commonly used (not only among Jews - cf. goniff) in Oz slang.

The only person I ever heard use shikker in the UK was my ex-father-in-law, who was Austrian Jewish, and had fled Vienna in 1938. I said this back in 2009, I see, but I’ll repeat myself: Hebrew shikor is related to Hebrew shekhar, “strong alcoholic drink”, which came down to English via ecclesiastical Greek sikera and Latin sicera/cisera to Old French sidre and English ‘cider’. In Akkadian, the equivalent word, šikarum, was use to translate Sumerian KAŠ, beer: but in the Quran the equivalent word in Arabic, sokara, is used to mean any intoxicant.

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Posted: 02 July 2012 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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The Hebrew word shekhar is indeed translated in the KJV (and the NEB) as “strong drink” (Proverbs 20:1); but I believe that scholars nowadays understand the Biblical word shekhar to refer to beverages fermented from grain, such as beer. In our time, “strong drink” is a term usually used in reference to distilled spirits; but it is very doubtful whether my forefathers were familiar with the distillation of alcohol at the time the Book of Proverbs is presumed to have been composed (I find comfort in the thought that they never knew what they were missing ;-). The fermentation process which produces beer-like beverages has, on the other hand, been known throughout the world since prehistoric times.

Anyone interested in “strong drink” will enjoy a vist to the website of the Amphora Society:

http://www.amphora-society.com/

(Edit: spelling correction)

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Posted: 03 July 2012 01:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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half-cut is common here in Essex. Have we had shit faced yet?

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Posted: 03 July 2012 02:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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oops yes we have

in b4 what’s the earliest use of drunkpost

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Posted: 17 July 2012 01:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I’ve heard “cut” in Australia, but it is not as common as “half-cut”.

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Posted: 17 July 2012 08:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Candy is dandy but shekhar is quikhar.

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Posted: 17 July 2012 12:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Hahahahaha!!!!  Bravo, Dr. Techie! 

P.S. Yayin* works fayin, too!

* Hebrew for “wine”—more or less rhymes with “buyin’”, “fryin’”

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