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HD: 2002 Words
Posted: 25 July 2012 03:15 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Craptacular, Bennifer, and Google-whacking

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Posted: 25 July 2012 05:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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A Google bomb is an attempt to design a website to take advantage of a search engine’s, especially Google’s, algorithm in order to make the site appear first among the listings.

That’s not a Google bomb, that’s just basic SEO. A Google bomb is when you do that for an unexpected, and usually comedic result such as getting Bush’s biography to rank for the keywords “miserable failure.”

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Posted: 25 July 2012 06:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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A few nitpicky notes:

fourteen-year-old Elizabeth Smart is kidnapped at knifepoint—she would eventually recovered alive nine months later

I think a word is missing here.  Perhaps a “be” could be inserted between “eventually” and “recovered”?

Wag, n.4 This Wag is from British professional soccer.

This jumped out at me, as the sport is not, of course, known as soccer to the British.  If you’re primarily aiming the book at an American audience, I can understand why you’d use the term for the sport that is familiar to Americans, but I think that if you said “British football” that most Americans would be able to do the math. Then again, maybe a guy who owns the boxed sets of Black Adder and Red Dwarf (and every book from Terry Pratchett’s Disc World series) isn’t the best judge of what most Americans could figure out when it comes to discerning the differences between British and American usage.

sausage fest, n. A sausage fest is a party with a high male-to-female ratio. Whether or not a sausage fest is a good thing depends on your perspective, although the term is generally used negatively.

I’m surprised this one isn’t older.  I was able to antedate it, I think, but just barely.  Via a googlebooks search, I found an “epinion” review of the City of Barstow, which has the title “sausage fest in a leisure suit”.  It is dated November of 2000. In the body of the review, the reviewer complains of the fact that the local nightclub, Ruby’s, had a ratio of “1 woman for every 5 cowboys in leisure suits”, which seems to be a call-back to the title of the review.

http://www.epinions.com/review/trvl-Dest-United_States-California-Barstow/trvl-review-5DC8-1414CB66-3A0C9190-prod2?sb=1

I’m tempted to note that the term “sausage fest” is usually used disparagingly because it is usually used by heterosexual men.  However, I have a sense that women (heterosexual or otherwise) don’t particularly enjoy finding themselves at a “sausage fest”, either, as it seems that a woman who does turn up at such an event will often find herself hounded by a group of aggressive and/or desperate men, which, apparently, is not much fun.

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Posted: 25 July 2012 08:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Svinyard118 - 25 July 2012 06:39 AM

A few nitpicky notes:

Wag, n.4 This Wag is from British professional soccer.

This jumped out at me, as the sport is not, of course, known as soccer to the British.  If you’re primarily aiming the book at an American audience, I can understand why you’d use the term for the sport that is familiar to Americans, but I think that if you said “British football” that most Americans would be able to do the math. Then again, maybe a guy who owns the boxed sets of Black Adder and Red Dwarf (and every book from Terry Pratchett’s Disc World series) isn’t the best judge of what most Americans could figure out when it comes to discerning the differences between British and American usage.

The word “soccer” originated in Britain as a slang term to distinguish between Rugby Football and Association Football.  (Also, go get a copy of Bend It Like Beckham for your collection.  The movie takes place mostly in Britain and at one point the girls enter a mall-type chain store called Soccer World.  Pretty sure that scene wasn’t re-shot or CG-edited for a U.S. edition!)

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Posted: 25 July 2012 08:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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GWOT, n. In 2002 the Bush Administration started referring to its foreign policy as the global war on terror, inadvertently generating this unfortunate acronym.

Why “unfortunate”?

noob, n. This variant on newbie, a “newcomer, rookie,” makes its appearance.

If you’re referring to the online usage, it’s canonically spelled n00b (with zeros instead of o’s).

The word “soccer” originated in Britain as a slang term to distinguish between Rugby Football and Association Football.

While of historical interest, that’s irrelevant to current usage; surely you’re not denying that essentially everyone in the UK refers to the sport as “football.” Furthermore, that seems to be catching on here in the US to some extent—at least, I just saw a sports story in my local paper that referred to “football” throughout, not even defining it as “soccer” on first occurrence.  So I agree that the word should be changed in the Wag entry.

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Posted: 25 July 2012 08:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Fair enough that the origins of the word are irrelevant.  But don’t British people know the sport is called soccer?  I’d also be intersted to know if there really is (or was) a chain of stores called Soccer World.

Edit:  The store in the Bend It Like Beckham movie is “Soccer Scene” and they are apparently all over the U.K. and online.

[ Edited: 25 July 2012 08:41 AM by jtab4994 ]
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Posted: 25 July 2012 09:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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My thought wasn’t that British people would be at a loss as to what the phrase “British professional soccer” referred to, but, rather, that they would find it deeply annoying.  Although, perhaps having an American unnecessarily spring to their defense is considerably MORE annoying.  (Having said that, British soccer sounds odd even to my decidedly American ears.)

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Posted: 25 July 2012 10:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I agree with S.; Brits will understand it, of course, but they won’t like it.

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Posted: 25 July 2012 10:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Hopefully they can get past it, like I do every time I read “baseballer” for “baseball player” (e.g. “baseballer Roger Maris” from Words of 1985).  Edit: (smiley)

[ Edited: 25 July 2012 10:20 AM by jtab4994 ]
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Posted: 25 July 2012 03:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I think that the English probably just need to suck that one up: most of the native English speaking world (US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Singapore, Ireland) means interpret “football” to mean something else (various other ball sports), and this ain’t the England Wide Web. “Soccer” is unambiguous.

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Posted: 26 July 2012 12:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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OP sums it up well. However as a native English-speaking Bit, I have to say that ‘soccer’ didn’t leap out at me in the way that most posters think it ought to have done. This is partly because I’m perfectly aware that Dave is writing as a American for an international target audience and it’s therefore a perfectly sensible choice of word (like OP said). Also don’t forget that we Brits DO use the word soccer ourselves. It remains a useful way to distinguish between the several varieties of football played in this country (soccer, rugby union, rugby league, gaelic plus both American and Aussie rules as minority interests).

A slight tangent, but I’m reminded about coming across a debate in the 1890s in back numbers of my old school’s magazine about whether the school should play rugby or association football. The terms used were ‘rugger’ and ‘sausage’. I have no idea how widespread ‘sausage’ was or whether it was peculiar to my school.

[Footnote: posher British boys’ schools tend to play rugby while others play soccer. I went to a state grammar school, so not a public (=private) school but one with some aspirations, hence rugby playing.]

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Posted: 26 July 2012 03:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Dr Fortran - 26 July 2012 12:40 AM

I’m reminded about coming across a debate in the 1890s in back numbers of my old school’s magazine about whether the school should play rugby or association football. The terms used were ‘rugger’ and ‘sausage’. I have no idea how widespread ‘sausage’ was or whether it was peculiar to my school.

[Footnote: posher British boys’ schools tend to play rugby while others play soccer. I went to a state grammar school, so not a public (=private) school but one with some aspirations, hence rugby playing.]

Not heard ‘sausage’ for soccer before, Dr F - reckon it was peculiar to your alma mater.

Like you, I went to a grammar school with pretensions, so it was cricket in the summer term, rugby in the autumn term, and in the spring term hockey - which I absolutely REFUSE to call “field hockey”, however confused North Americans might get.

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Posted: 26 July 2012 04:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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My choice of soccer was for clarity as OP Tipping suggests. Throughout this series (and generally on the website) I’ve used soccer regardless of the national context. The only time I use football is in the phrase American football, which I always specify as such. If this were a one-off piece or the series were about Briticisms or association football, then I would probably opt for football. But to switch back and forth in a series that addresses so many topics from both sides of the pond would be more confusing. Also, I’ve got the eventually book in mind, and I’m going to have to cut a lot of material. So taking up space with continual explanations of what I’m referring to won’t fly.

And I disagree that most Americans would figure out that football really meant soccer. As a nation that dominates the world economically, politically, and militarily, we don’t get out all that much and are amazingly insular.

But I’ve changed this particular entry to read “a Briticism from the world of professional soccer.” My point was really that it was a British acronym, not that soccer is British.

[ Edited: 26 July 2012 04:28 AM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 26 July 2012 04:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Happydog and others,

Is there a technical difference between Google bombing and SEO? As far as I can tell, they to accomplish exactly the same thing.

The only difference that I can see is intent; Google bombing is done for comic, satiric, and political purposes, while SEO is done for commercial purposes. If that’s the case, then one man’s Google bomb is another’s SEO.

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Posted: 26 July 2012 06:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Is there a technical difference between Google bombing and SEO? As far as I can tell, they to accomplish exactly the same thing.

That’s an odd point of view.  Language is more than “technical difference.”

The only difference that I can see is intent; Google bombing is done for comic, satiric, and political purposes, while SEO is done for commercial purposes.

In other words, they’re entirely different, and I have never seen them confused before.  You’re defending the wrong hill here.

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Posted: 26 July 2012 02:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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The difference between Google bombing and SEO is the same as the difference between rickrolling someone vs. “posting a link to YouTube.”

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