HD: 2005 Words
Posted: 30 July 2012 04:32 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Posted: 30 July 2012 04:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Typo: “North Korea announces that it” not “is”.

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Posted: 30 July 2012 07:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Haji, n. A Haji is a Muslim who has made the pilgrimage to Mecca, and this sense of the term in English usage dates back to the early-seventeenth century. But in 2005 in U. S. military slang Haji acquired the sense of any native of a Muslim country.

Although the word usually has one -j- in this transferred sense, it is correctly spelled with two (Hajji), so I think this should read: “A Hajji is a Muslim who has made the pilgrimage to Mecca (the Hajj)...” Also, there should be no hyphen after “early.”

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Posted: 30 July 2012 01:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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it is correctly spelled with two (Hajji)

I would hesitate to prescribe a “correct” spelling. Some spell it with one “J”, some with two; some prefer to spell the words as “Hadji” and “Hadj”. All spellings of these words using Latin letters are, after all, at best approximations.

(edited to correct typo)

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Posted: 30 July 2012 01:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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No, Arabic makes a distinction between single and double consonants and this word has a double j.  Furthermore, if you’ll do a Google search you’ll discover that when talking about actual pilgrims hajji is far more common in English.

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