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HD: 2006-Present Words
Posted: 03 August 2012 03:52 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Birthers, WikiLeaks, and lolcats

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Posted: 03 August 2012 04:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Kosher phone, n. Their congregations needed the ability to use a mobile phone, but could not be allowed access to the internet or other had been deactivated.

This sentence missing something or rewritten

lolcat, n. Lolcat is a compound of the internet acronym lol “lots of laughs” + cat.

I’d always assumed “laugh out loud”.

tebowing, n. This 2011 term for a public demonstration of prayer comes from the practice of Denver Broncos (now New York Jets) quarterback Tim Tebow of kneeling on one knee with his elbow on that knee.

This makes it sound like you’re putting your elbow on the knee that is in contact with the ground.

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Posted: 03 August 2012 06:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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tebowing, n. This 2011 term for a public demonstration of prayer comes from the practice of Denver Broncos (now New York Jets) quarterback Tim Tebow of kneeling on one knee with his elbow on that knee.

In practice it’s more of a pose than a demonstration of prayer, despite its origins.

tiger mother, n. A tiger mother is a strict parent…

Also commonly “tiger mom”, modelled after “soccer mom”.

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Posted: 03 August 2012 06:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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macaca… Allen subsequently claimed that he didn’t know what the word meant (it is not generally used in English)

Since, as you say, it’s not generally used in English, it might be useful to mention it’s a racial slur in many of the places where it is used.

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Posted: 03 August 2012 07:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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lolcat, n. ... Lolcat is a compound of the internet acronym lol “lots of laughs” + cat.

I agree with Faldage: LOL (it’s usually all caps) is “laugh out loud.” See Wikipedia, where the derivation is referenced.

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Posted: 03 August 2012 07:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Vegansexuals: The phrasing of this definition is ambiguous. As it stands, it could mean that Vegansexuals won’t have sex with each other, and will consequently soon become extinct, like Shakers. I suggest you either erase “else”, or add “so” after “does”, depending on what you mean.

macaque was (for example) the word used by Europeans in the Belgian Congo, to refer to the locals. It’s more than a racial slur: it’s an indication of a state of mind --- the sort that made it O.K. to kidnap people, take them to a foreign land, and there reduce them to the status of work animals. Anybody who uses it unknowingly is too ignorant an asshole even to be a politician.

Ha! Bring on the nits - I’m developing an appetite! --- But of course, it’s too late for that, since I suppose the series must end here. I already feel an intense nostalgia for the lists of earlier years, and have just been going over the list for 1900, heavy with terms like come-hither, four-stroke, Moebius surface, ping-pong, turbo-, voyeur.......Won’t you go back to the beginning, Dave, and start again? Please? So it’ll be a fatter book. Or two books (I’ll buy them both, sight unseen!).

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Posted: 03 August 2012 07:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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He got LOL right in the 2005 Words entry for lulz, though:

A respelling and pluralization of the internet acronym LOL, or laughing out loud.

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Posted: 03 August 2012 09:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Dave, Dave, Dave!

(Meaningless addition added so message will post.)

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Posted: 03 August 2012 10:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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IMHO it would be appropriate to note that culturomics is one of many terms formed in imitation of genomics, etc.

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Posted: 04 August 2012 01:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Thinking of words like culturomics, genomics, etc I wondered why they should take the plural form. I know that in old texts I’ve come across the mathematic before in reference to the discipline. OED confirms that such terms were indeed singular at one time.

From the entry for -ic suffix

In English, such words of this class as were in use before 1500 had the singular form, and were usually written, after French, -ique, -ike, as arsmetike, magike, musike, logike (-ique), retorique, mathematique (-ike, -ik), mechanique, economique, ethyque (-ik); this form is retained in arithmetic, logic, magic, music, rhetoric (though logics has also been used). But, from the 15th c., forms in -ics (-iques) occur as names of treatises (repr. Greek names in -ικά or their Latin translations in -ica), e.g. etiques = τὰ ἠθικά; and in the second half of the 16th c. this form is found applied to the subject matter of such treatises, in mathematics, economics, etc. From 1600 onward, this has been the accepted form with names of sciences, as acoustics, conics, dynamics, ethics, linguistics, metaphysics, optics, statics, or matters of practice, as æsthetics, athletics, economics, georgics, gymnastics, politics, tactics. The names of sciences, even though they have the form in -ics, are now construed as singular, as in ‘mathematics is the science of quantity; its students are mathematicians’; in recent times some writers, following German or French usage, have preferred to use a form in -ic, as in dialectic, dogmatic, ethic, metaphysic, static, etc. Names of practical matters as gymnastics, politics, tactics, usually remain plural, in construction as well as in form.

There is at least one instance of the singular and plural forms coming to signify different fields of study, viz physic and physics.

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Posted: 04 August 2012 11:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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This list contains a considerable number of terms which will have little or no currency outside the USA. They refer to purely local events or phenomena.  President Obama’s birthplace may be a matter of urgent interest to Americans - but it’s much less so to English speakers in Gibraltar, in Singapore, or in either of both major Perths (or to me, either). The same goes for “death panel”, “deather”, “mooner”, “truther”, “hiking the Appalachian trail”, “foot tapper”, “tebowing”, “locavore”, “public option”, “teabagger” --- among others. These words are so strongly localized in their meaningfulness (is that a word?) that I wonder if they don’t come into the category of “dialect”, even if citizens of the USA do make up 2/3 of the world’s population of speakers of English as a first language.

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Posted: 05 August 2012 02:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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A tiger mother is a strict parent

The particular feature of a tiger mother, surely, is not simply the strictness, but the oppressive emphasis on making sure her children work extremely hard at their lessons and achieve as much as possible.

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Posted: 05 August 2012 03:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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This list contains a considerable number of terms which will have little or no currency outside the USA. They refer to purely local events or phenomena.  President Obama’s birthplace may be a matter of urgent interest to Americans - but it’s much less so to English speakers in Gibraltar, in Singapore, or in either of both major Perths (or to me, either). The same goes for “death panel”, “deather”, “mooner”, “truther”, “hiking the Appalachian trail”, “foot tapper”, “tebowing”, “locavore”, “public option”, “teabagger” --- among others. These words are so strongly localized in their meaningfulness (is that a word?) that I wonder if they don’t come into the category of “dialect”, even if citizens of the USA do make up 2/3 of the world’s population of speakers of English as a first language.

This is due to the source. “Among the New Words” tends to include a lot of words of transient currency and skews heavily to the US.

Locavore, while it may be primarily a US word, applies generally and it seems as if it is here to stay. Birther is a huge word in the US; I can’t underestimate how big the birther phenomenon is in the US. Truther isn’t as big, but it’s been around longer and doesn’t look like it’s going away. (Mooner and deather are rarer and the later appears to have been transient; I included these two only because of the connection to truther.) Tebowing, hiking the Appalachian trail, and foot tapper were all big in the year they hit the news--many of the words in this series fall into that category.

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Posted: 07 August 2012 01:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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1/
Am I right in thinking Palin coined hopey-changey?

2/
bunga-bunga
Incidentally, this word means “flowers” in Indonesian.

3/
The Kosher-phone definition needs some repair.

According to this article:
http://www.pri.org/stories/science/technology/orthodox-jews-in-united-kingdom-offer-kosher-certified-cell-phones-8125.html
The kosher phones are stripped down devices that can only receive and make calls...“So no network would come really and make those changes,” Rose said. “So the changes had to made from the hardware and software in the device, rather than from network level. So the devices are modified. No cameras allowed, no SMS allowed, no Internet allowed.” ...  Rose says the phones have been a big hit. Not just to protect children, but among adults who prefer the simplicity.”

Currently the definition here reads: Their congregations needed the ability to use a mobile phone, but could not be allowed access to the internet or other mass media until such features had been deactivated.
They couldn’t be allowed access to the Internet etc until the Internet etc had been deactivated??

How about “Their congregations needed the ability to use a mobile phone, but could not be allowed access to the internet or other mass media, so such features were deactivated.”

(BTW ... WTF? If they needed a mobile phone that had internet deactivated, why not just get any of hundreds of models of non-smart phones on the market, rather than getting a smart-phone that had been specially hardwired to have no internet access? Talk about throwing money away.)

[ Edited: 07 August 2012 02:11 PM by OP Tipping ]
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Posted: 08 August 2012 06:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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(BTW ... WTF? If they needed a mobile phone that had internet deactivated, why not just get any of hundreds of models of non-smart phones on the market, rather than getting a smart-phone that had been specially hardwired to have no internet access? Talk about throwing money away.)

Just guessing, but it might be that Jews (and perhaps Muslims and others that celebrate weekly holy days that require non-creative activity) would like to reactivate their Internet access after the Sabbath is over. Still, this is confusing to me. I would think that making a phone call on any kind of phone would not be Kosher on the Sabbath.

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Posted: 08 August 2012 06:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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IANARA (I am not a rabbinical authority), but my understanding is that virtually all mobile phones have SMS capability, and that, is forbidden. Similarly, finding a phone nowadays that doesn’t have a camera is difficult. Cameras present the opportunity for “immodesty.” There may also be apps, like GPS, calculators, document readers, etc. that are kosher and necessary, but they are only available on smartphones. So the kosher phones deactivate only the functionality that is forbidden. The kosher phones are not to be used on the sabbath.

Although, I saw a news item that discusses a cell phone that could be used on the sabbath. Evidently, it doesn’t technically make an electrical connection when dialed. There are drawbacks though, like a significant delay between dialing the number and making the connection.

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