Sex-Neutral Terms
Posted: 17 October 2012 03:41 AM   [ Ignore ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4754
Joined  2007-01-03

My response to an uneven Johnson blog post.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 October 2012 03:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1181
Joined  2007-02-14

Just a note about seaman vs. sailorSailor can be used for all pay-grades; seaman is applied to pay-grades E-1 through E-3, and, more strictly, only to pay-grade E-3, E-1 and E-2 being seaman recruit and seaman apprentice respectively.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 October 2012 04:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2335
Joined  2007-01-30

Is the verb considered acceptable? Would NASA, for instance, still speak of a manned mission to Mars or manned spaceflight?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 October 2012 04:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4754
Joined  2007-01-03

Those examples aren’t verbs, they’re adjectives. But the verb I’ve heard used to replace to man is to crew, as in “four men and three women crewed the space shuttle mission.”

Looking over the NASA website it looks like human is the preferred term over manned. For instance, the office in charge of putting people into space is the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate. But manned creeps into the lingo when they’re not paying attention. Manned also appears quite often in official histories with no apparent attempt to update the language of earlier eras.

[ Edited: 17 October 2012 04:24 AM by Dave Wilton ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 October 2012 07:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2335
Joined  2007-01-30
Dave Wilton - 17 October 2012 04:22 AM

Those examples aren’t verbs, they’re adjectives.

Right. I was thinking of the verb to man and jumped straight to manned without thinking. As to the verb, Man the lifeboats! Crew the lifeboats? Yes, that works.

I’m sure we’ve covered manhole before although I can’t for the life of me recall what the PC version is.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 October 2012 07:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2842
Joined  2007-01-31

Well, they’re participial adjectives whose existence depends on the corresponding verb.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 October 2012 01:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  232
Joined  2008-07-19
aldiboronti - 17 October 2012 07:26 AM

I’m sure we’ve covered manhole before although I can’t for the life of me recall what the PC version is.

On architectural drawings they are usually labelled IC for ‘inspection chamber’, but almost always read as ‘manhole’!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 October 2012 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3109
Joined  2007-02-26

Hmm.  I would have thought the manhole was the gap that lets you get to the inspection chamber.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 October 2012 09:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  246
Joined  2007-02-16

Manhole?  I think peep-le hole would be a good neutral alternative ;-)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 October 2012 12:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  232
Joined  2008-07-19
Skibberoo - 18 October 2012 09:35 PM

Manhole?  I think peep-le hole would be a good neutral alternative ;-)

Or even pee-ple hole, given what they mostly give access to.

Profile