2 of 2
2
Pram
Posted: 12 December 2012 06:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1226
Joined  2007-04-28

It looks like spat the dummy is also British then which does make more sense. I read the Schultz got out of his pram anecdote in a Walkman-sized booked called Phrases by Nigel Rees which I no longer have. It could be a Welsh idiom which Kinnock is.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 December 2012 11:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1226
Joined  2007-04-28

I have also remembered a famous pram quote (probably the only one) in Brit lit crit by Cyril Connolly: “There is no more sombre enemy of good art than the pram in the hall.” Baby carriage in the vestibule of a domestic household? He means parenthood doesn’t redound well to continued artistic output.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 03:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  820
Joined  2007-06-20

The modern British baby is wheeled about in a buggy, which seems to be differentiated from a stroller by having a (detachable/folding) hood. Exactly what the difference between a buggy and a modern pushchair is, I know not (despite having been a buggy-pusher as recently as 10 years ago): the traditional pram seems to have vanished from the nation’s halls, judging by the articles on offer via the UK’s best-known department store, John Lewis, here.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1373
Joined  2007-01-29

Since John Lewis tells us that no page on prams is to be found, they definitely can’t have any, so you’re spot on there.  But all that will change, of course, when Kate and Wills (or their nanny) are seen pushing their shiny new retro made-in-the-UK Silver Cross Balmoral pram about in summer.

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 2
2
 
‹‹ HD: Ranting About Hyphens      Somersaullt ››