Seven swans a-swimming
Posted: 22 December 2012 05:28 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Wheel ... of ... Fortune!
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/20/wheel-of-fortune-seven-swans_n_2340428.html

The board shows SE_EN S__NS _-S__MM_NG.

The correct answer is “Sevens swans a-swimming”.

Renee gives this answer, but pronounces the last consonant as an /n/ rather than an /ŋ/. Renee’s pronunciation would be standard in a number of dialects.

This is deemed incorrect. The next contestant, Amy, gives the same answer but is careful to velarise clearly, and is thus the winner.

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Posted: 23 December 2012 01:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Renee wuz robbed!

With tongue nowhere near velum, I go along with this http://www.pronounceitright.com/pronounce/11009/swimming

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Posted: 23 December 2012 04:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I don’t know the programme, but it’s a presumably a knowledge quiz, not a spelling bee or a pronunciation test, have I got that right? In which case, if the contestant knew and gave the phrase asked for, that was a correct answer.

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Posted: 23 December 2012 05:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 23 December 2012 04:47 AM

I don’t know the programme, but it’s a presumably a knowledge quiz, not a spelling bee or a pronunciation test, have I got that right? In which case, if the contestant knew and gave the phrase asked for, that was a correct answer.

Not quite.  A common phrase is chosen and represented by a number of blanks.  Players spin the wheel that indicates how much a correct guess is worth and ask for a given letter.  If that letter is present in the chosen phrase all instances of its presence are revealed and the player gets another turn.  If the letter is not present the turn goes to the next player.  Any player has the choice of guessing what the chosen phrase is at any time during their turn.

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Posted: 23 December 2012 05:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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But this part is right:

In which case, if the contestant knew and gave the phrase asked for, that was a correct answer.

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Posted: 23 December 2012 07:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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One-nil to prescriptivists.  If I’d answered that question in a South African accent, I’d have said, “Sivun swons e-swummung” which would presumably also have been deemed wrong.

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Posted: 23 December 2012 08:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I watch the the program a couple of days a week and I have always assumed the participants have been coached in advance to use a careful, forced executed elocution rather like school kids in a contest might be coached.  Except for amount of money the whole thing is rather silly and I gather, quite popular.

My spouse saw the episode in question and she says that she noticed the incident but assumed it was the result of failure to comply with something that took place behind the scenes.

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Posted: 23 December 2012 09:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’ve been to a taping of the show and there was a “ruling” that took place on a different issue. It all happened with the cameras off. A producer announced over a loudspeaker what the judge had ruled and why so everyone, audience included, could hear what was going on. The contestant asked a question for clarification (which we all heard) and the answer came back over the loudspeaker and when everyone was satisfied, the taping resumed. It was all very much out in the open. And they definitely are warned to speak very carefully and clearly. Personally, I would have given it to her.

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Posted: 23 December 2012 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I can understand why they require clear enunciation on a game like this. if those are the rules that are presented to the contestants, the judges and host have an obligation to follow the rules. But if such is not a rule that is clearly explained in advance, they should have given it to her.

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Posted: 27 December 2012 02:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Faldage - 23 December 2012 05:40 AM

Players spin the wheel that indicates how much a correct guess is worth and ask for a given letter.  If that letter is present in the chosen phrase all instances of its presence are revealed and the player gets another turn.

Just to clarify (for the benefit of the droves of people flocking to an etymology forum to find out the rules of Wheel of Fortune), the values on the wheel indicate the amount of money awarded per letter if the contestant asks for a consonant that is indeed in the phrase.  For example, if a contestant spins $500 and asks for a T, she is awarded $2000 (and another turn) if the phrase contains four T’s.  The contestant who correctly guesses the phrase wins whatever money she has accumulated in that round.

(Edited to correct needlessly mangled verb tenses.)

[ Edited: 27 December 2012 02:33 PM by NotThatGuy ]
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Posted: 27 December 2012 08:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Boy, those final Gs will be coming across loud, clear and (as in some N. England accents) as hard as nails in future programmes, we can be sure of that!

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Posted: 30 December 2012 12:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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But don’t think you’re going home empty-handed. All contestants receive the Wordorigins home version.

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Posted: 30 December 2012 04:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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aldiboronti - 27 December 2012 08:20 PM

Boy, those final Gs will be coming across loud, clear and (as in some N. England accents) as hard as nails in future programmes, we can be sure of that!

I wonder.  If she answered a later one with a final /ɪŋg/ would she be told that was wrong?

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