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Where did these words come from in the English language? 
Posted: 07 January 2013 05:46 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello and happy new year to everybody. And special thanks to Dave for this site which is made for a very small percentage of people.
I warned everybody in the previous article that everything I say sounds insane. Therefore it is no surprise to me the reaction of some readers, nor do I blame them, because the reaction was natural. This article will soften that attitude I presume, because logic prevails. The puzzle presented here is such that anyone who analyzes these words, will realize that something is terribly wrong with today’s understanding of the evolution of the English language and perhaps with other languages as well. 
Below are some words which are the same in English and Romanian, but not in Latin. These words are extremely important in any language and no country that has these words in its vocabulary touches borders with Romania. If these words came in the English language via France, where did France get them from? And of course where Romanian language did acquired them from?
ROMANIAN.........ENGLISH............LATIN
frica...................fear/freak out....timor
pozitie................position.............situs
gradina..............garden..............hortus
garda................guard.................custodia
galop.................gallop................cursus
garinizoana.........garrison............praesidium
general..[army]...general.............dux
specie.................species.............genus
copie...................copy.................imitari
batalion...............battalion............cohort
crima...................crime................scelus
creatie.................creation.............fabrication
carcasa................carcass.............cadaver
curte....................court.................atrium
real......................real...................verus
zel........................zeal..................ardor
zona.....................zone.................cingulus
dune.....................dunes...............tumulus
martir....................martyr.............devotus
tradare..................treason.............maiestas
mesaj....................message...........nuntius
superior.................superior............amplior
support..................support.............firmamentum
suprem..................supreme...........sumus
strain.....................stranger............peregrines
special...................special..............praecipuus
revolta...................revolt...............seditio
curaj......................courage............fortitude
periferie.................periphery..........ambitus
rasa.......................race..................genus
calitate...................quality...............indoles
povara....................burden/poverty..gravis
privelege.................privilege............imunitas
caravana.................caravan.............commeatus
capitan....................captain..............centurion
bandit......................bandit................latro
repeta.....................repeat................iterare
relatie.....................relation...............ratio
calm........................calm...................tranquillus
serenada..................serenade

The word “creation” is on this table, because its origin is as Romanian as it can be. CREIER is “brain” hence CREATIE. Only Romanian language has the word “creier”. The word “martyr” is known to be of Greek origin, but it has the roots in Romanian. Can anyone in the whole world explain the origin of these words in both languages? They do not exist in Latin, a few are believed to be of Greek origin, but I can prove that all these words have roots in Romanian.
Let’s take “gallop” for example.
The word “horse” is CAL in Romanian.
Romanian...............Latin...............English
CAL........................EQU...............HORSE
CALARE..................EQUESTER......MOUNTED
CALARET.................EQUES...........RIDER
CALATOR................VIATOR..........TRAVELER
GALOP....................CURSUS.........GALLOP
All the words in the above lexicon are related to “horse” and the English language shows how “broken” it is. Notice the word CALATOR “traveler”. Romanian ancestors the Skits practically lived on the horse and that is why the grouping of words is almost perfect. But it is the Latin EQU that is the vernacular word for “horse” not the Romanian CAL. The word CAL appeared later when people started riding the horse. From EQU the word EQUAL Romanian EGAL appeared and from E-GAL the word GAL/CAL “horse” evolved. The word “equal” appeared at the time of first horse riding, because the horse “equalized” people. While on foot some big strong people dominated, but things changed drastically when on top of the horse. The one that could keep the best “EQU-ilibrium” on top of the hose had great advantage. While GALOP stayed the same over thousands of years, the word GAL “horse” changed to CAL in Romanian. 
An Italian named Francesco Griselini was in Romania for a couple of years in 1776. He learned Romanian and wrote a book about Banat region. There is a very interesting statement in his book. Griselini knew Latin very well and understood the Latin part of the language being there, but was very surprised that very many Italian words were in the language as well. Not only that, but simple Romanians were using words in everyday conversations which only highly educated Italians utilized. This statement is made by Griselini 250 years ago. Where did Romanian farmers get those words from?
I will not say now how these words ended up in English language, because it is one of those “insane” things and it is not enough space to deploy enough evidence for backing up my statement.
Please feel free to discuss and debate this.

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Posted: 07 January 2013 09:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Spend some time at this site: http://www.etymonline.com/

Taking “creation” and “carcass” from your list:

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=creation

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=carcass

And looking at: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=create

refutes your position.

[ Edited: 07 January 2013 10:48 PM by sobiest ]
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Posted: 08 January 2013 01:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Romanian...............Latin...............English
CAL........................EQU...............HORSE

So, um, you don’t think cal might be related to the Latin caballus ?
Like so many other horsey words in the Romance languages are?
Worth considering.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 03:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The list ignores many Latin words. For example, martyr is a indeed a word in Latin (ultimately from Greek), and devotus is not a synonym. It’s an adjective meaning “devoted, worshipful.” Ditto for message (missus in Latin), revolt (revolutio in Latin), and many others.

Many of the military terms in both English and Romanian are from French. In sixteenth and seventeenth century French military vocabulary spread throughout Europe. And note that general is also from a Latin root and dux survives in English as duke.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 06:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Again, I would say that if people want to spend their time and energy trying to explain facts to someone who has no interest in anything outside his own head, they are wasting their time.  He is interested only in spreading his own “wisdom” and having us talk about it.  I will pay 5 (FIVE) dollars to everyone here assembled if anything said in these threads changes the mind of our all-knowing poster.  (Hey, I’m cheap.)

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Posted: 08 January 2013 08:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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It’s a safe bet, lh. I can’t see Mr raven alb j. being open to persuasion on this, more especially as it’s a chapter (The First Words) of his magnum opus, Ice Ages, Animal Extinctions and the Great Flood Explained, which itself is apparently part of a projected work entitled Why and How the Ice Age Ended & The True History of the Pontic (White) Race.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 10:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I’m under no illusions about the prospects for convincing Raven J Alb. But there is a wider audience to consider who are less linguistically informed than the regulars on this site.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 11:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Fair enough.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 12:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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In which cause, I’ve analysed raven alb’s Big List. The vast majority derive quite straightforwardly from a common Latin root; many of the English ones, as you would expect, went via French. They are:

ROMANIAN / ENGLISH / LATIN

pozitie / position / positio
crima / crime / crimen
specie / species / species
superior / superior / superior
suprem / supreme / supremus
relatie / relation / relatio
creatie / creation / creatio
privelege / privilege / privilegio
special / special / specialis
calitate / quality / qualitatis
real / real / realis
zel / zeal / zelus
support / support / supportare
tradare / treason / tradire (verb)
mesaj / message / missio (‘a thing sent’)
capitan / captain / capitanus
strain / stranger / extraneus
revolta / revolt / revolutio
repeta / repeat / repetitio
curaj / courage / cor (’heart’, the seat of bravery)
serenada / serenade / serenus (via Italian ‘serenata’)
general [army] / general / generalis
povara / burden/poverty / pauper
batalion / battalion / battualia/battalia (Late Latin)
carcasa / carcass / carcosium (Medieval Latin)
bandit / bandit / bannīre (Medieval Latin ‘proclaim, proscribe’)
copie / copy / cōpia (Medieval Latin)
curte / court / cortis/curtis (Medieval Latin)
zona / zone / zona (ultimately from Greek)
martir / martyr / martyr (ultimately from Greek)

One is Greek:

periferie/periphery

One is from Persian: 

caravana/caravan

Six came into English via French and all have cognates in a wide range of Romance languages, so we might expect to find them in Romanian also:

- rasa/race: may derive (through French) from Latin ratio or the back half of generatio; or from the Old French word haraz meaning ‘horses kept for breeding’, which *may* come from Arabic.
- gallop/gallop: old French origin, possibly ultimately from the Old German root ‘hlauf’, to run. 
- calm/calm: Almost the only doubtful one. Old French, possibly from late Latin cauma ‘burning heat, heat of the day’ (i.e. siesta time).
- gradina /garden: Old French, from Germanic (with a medieval Latin form ‘gardinum’
- garinizoana/garrison: Old French origin, possibly from an Old German root ‘warjan’, to defend.
- garda/guard: Old French, from Germanic

Which leaves only two whose relationship isn’t obvious:

- dune/dune: The English word comes from Old English dún, possibly ultimately Celtic which has cognates in many Germanic languages. I’ve no idea about the Romanian word.

- frica/fear. The English word comes from Old English and has cognates in other Germanic/Norse languages; its earliest meaning was ‘a sudden and terrible event; peril’. No idea about the Romanian word, but they aren’t so alike as to suggest any relationship. (Implying that ‘freak out’ is related to either is, of course, absurd; the phrase dates only from the 1960s, and does not mean ‘to be afraid’ or anything like it.)

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Posted: 08 January 2013 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I admire your work ethic, SL.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 01:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Romanian duna ‘dune’, pl. dune ‘dunes’, is probably from French dune which is itself a loan from Dutch. A possible etymology for Romanian frică ‘fear, apprehension; fright’ may be from Greek φρικη (phrikē) ‘shuddering, shivering’.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 01:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I admire your work ethic, SL.

Moi aussi!

And jheem is right about duna (probably from French dune) and frică (from Greek φρικη), according to my source for Romanian etymologies.

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Posted: 08 January 2013 02:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Patience on a monument has nothing on you, Syntinen!

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Posted: 08 January 2013 05:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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"Creier” looks like Latin “cerebrum”.

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Posted: 09 January 2013 12:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Work ethic, dedication to the cause - humbling!

curtseys

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Posted: 09 January 2013 06:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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“Creier” looks like Latin “cerebrum”.

Exactly right, that’s its origin.

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